Introducing the Gizmag Store

Moving cars could be used to measure rainfall

By

November 28, 2013

The RainCars project's lab setup

The RainCars project's lab setup

Rain gauges are generally pretty accurate at measuring the amount of precipitation that has fallen at their location, but they can't be everywhere. This means that average rainfall figures for a region could be inaccurate, if considerably more or less rain has been falling in unmonitored areas. Cars, however, are just about everywhere that there are roads. With that in mind, researchers from Germany's University of Hanover are looking at using them to tell us how much water is coming from the sky.

When you're driving and it starts raining, what's the first thing that you do? That's right, you turn on the windshield wipers. The harder it rains, the faster the setting that you select. Scientists with U Hanover's RainCars project postulated that if select cars where outfitted with GPS and wiper speed-monitoring sensors, they could provide real-time data on how much rain was falling in a wide number of locations.

In order to test their theory, they set up an experiment in which a stationary car was placed under a sprinkler system, with a person inside the car. As water flowed from the sprinkler, at known output rates, the person turned up the speed of the wipers in order to maintain their view through the windshield. It turned out that there was a fairly consistent correlation between the speed of the wipers, and the amount of water coming from the sprinkler – in other words, the flow rate of the sprinkler could be roughly determined by measuring wiper speed.

One problem with this approach, however, is that not all drivers are equally fussy about how moisture-free they like their windshield. Therefore, the RainCars team believe that their system would work better on cars with optical sensors that automatically adjust the speed of the wipers – an increasing number of which are already on the roads.

Additionally, though, factors such as car speed, wind, and road spray from other cars also affect how much rain hits the windshield. The scientists are looking at ways of correcting for these variables. Even if they only have limited success in doing so, they believe that a large number of approximate rainfall figures gathered by cars will still provide a more reliable overall picture than more accurate readings from just a few rain gauges.

Field trials are already under way in the city of Hanover, with volunteer drivers and a taxi service taking part. A paper on the research was recently published in the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences.

Source: University of Hanover

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
Tags
3 Comments

One variable they may not have considered is dust that may be kicked up in certain conditions, necessitating washing the windscreen (and turning on the wipers), as well as regular washer squirts in winter driving, to deal with copious amounts of dirt that gets on the screen, especially in snowy weather. Could give false readings.

bergamot69
29th November, 2013 @ 07:02 am PST

And another significant variable is the speed at which the car is passing through the falling rain. Faster car – greater volume of rain on windshield. I don't know why they didn't think this one through.

HighPockets
29th November, 2013 @ 08:07 am PST

A lot of people use RainX and other similar products. Even the heaviest of rain storms, I rarely have to use the wipers if the coating is less than a couple months old.

Timbac2
3rd December, 2013 @ 01:20 pm PST
Post a Comment

Login with your gizmag account:

Or Login with Facebook:


Related Articles

Just enter your friends and your email address into the form below

For multiple addresses, separate each with a comma




Privacy is safe with us because we have a strict privacy policy.

Looking for something? Search our 26,565 articles