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Salt water-powered Quant e-Sportlimousine gets European approval

By

July 18, 2014

Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration

Nunzio La Vecchia accepts the TÜV registration

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After making a debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show, the Quant e-Sportlimousine has received approval from Germany's TÜV Süd. The car, which uses an electrolyte flow cell power system, is now certified for use on German and European roads.

As I stood around waiting for NanoFlowcell's Geneva Motor Show press conference in March, my eyes bounced back and forth between the exotic curves of the concept car at center dais, the oddly punctuated letters of the make and model and the bubbling tanks of water that looked like they were ripped off the wall of an after-hours lounge. Then Nunzio La Vecchia sauntered out, wearing his best jet black pompadour, and made a bunch of bold claims about the 912-hp, gull-winged 2x2 and its bleeding-edge flow cell technology.

Nunzio La Vecchia presents the e-Sportlimousine to the crowd of journalists

Everything about the scene suggested that it might very well have been the last we heard of the NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine. Promises of a magic bullet of energy storage, made by a three-month-old company, packaged with outlandish numbers like 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 2.8 seconds and a top speed of 236 mph (380 km/h), hinted, rather strongly, that this car's technology and performance would only exist on paper. Given that a similarly outlandish Quant car, centered in a similar black-walled booth, introduced by a very different Nunzio La Vecchia company, had vaporized years earlier, it seemed a responsible assumption that the e-Sportlimousine would do the same.

Just a few months after its debut, however, the car has resurfaced and taken a step forward. After an in-depth inspection of the car, the German TÜV Süd in Munich handed over the official registration plate this week. Now the company will be able to test the car on public roads in Germany and Europe as it prepares it for series production.

"We are delighted as pioneers to be able to present an automobile driven by flow cell technology on public roads, and one which achieves not only fantastic performance values but also zero emissions," said Le Vecchia, tossing out a slightly revised set of numbers, including "a projected top speed of over 350 km/h (217.5 mph), acceleration from 0-100 in 2.8 seconds, a torque of four times 2,900 Nm (2,139 lb-ft) and a range of more than 600 km (373 mi)."

The flow cell system powering the Quant e-Sportlimousine's four electric motors develops electricity from an electrochemical reaction created by two electrolyte solutions. This electricity is forwarded to super capacitors where its stored and distributed.

The NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine at the 2014 Geneva show

Beyond fancy supercars, NanoFlowcell sees its technology taking on a variety of applications. Presumably it will work its way down to more affordable cars, but its perceived potential reaches far beyond the road's edge.

"We've got major plans, and not just within the automobile industry," says NanoFlowcell AG Chairman of the Board Prof. Jens-Peter Ellermann. "The potential of the NanoFlowcell is much greater, especially in terms of domestic energy supplies as well as in maritime, rail and aviation technology. The NanoFlowcell offers a wide range of applications as a sustainable, low cost and environmentally-friendly source of energy."

We'll wait to see the Quant e-Sportlimousine live up to its billing before we get too excited about that future expansion.

Source: NanoFlowcell

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
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20 Comments

Am I wrong to assume this probably uses something similar to an Aluminium–air battery that is essentially non-rechargeable?

Daishi
19th July, 2014 @ 12:25 am PDT

It would be nice if Gizmag redaction did some facts checking before publishing articles promoting Nunzio La Vecchia. Although flowcells do exist, their performance is nowhere close to the claims described here.

I recommend googling a bit about the guy. The discussion on this page provides plenty of links to past and present scams of Nunzio La Vecchia:

http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/28239-NanoFlowcell-Quant/page3

Hovnimrsk Prdelac
19th July, 2014 @ 06:07 am PDT

Amazing figures are quoted, but no technical explanation. And what is different between this and the Koenigsegg Quant featured back in March 2009 ?

Martin Hone
20th July, 2014 @ 07:33 pm PDT

Sounds good - pull into the supermarket instead of the servo ...

"A kilo of salt please, oh, and can I use that outside tap?"

BUT - I can see the price of salt soaring as Big Govt spots the popularity, just like our supposedly cheap diesel soared in price.

The Skud
20th July, 2014 @ 09:02 pm PDT

if it were true,what good would it do if it were out of reach of 99.99% of new car buyers?

salcen
21st July, 2014 @ 09:11 am PDT

More details, this article: http://www.gizmag.com/900-hp-supercar-flow-battery/31091/.

kalqlate
21st July, 2014 @ 09:16 am PDT

I agree the big deal here is the flowcell. If it actually performs as claimed it would be at least 20 times as efficient as the next best competitor that I have seen. With an over powered 900hp machine like this, a range of 375 miles would need something like 200kwh. They claim to get that from a tank that can fit in a motor-vehicle. The best "salt-water battery" I've seen has nowhere even close to that density.

So I will be eagerly watching to see if the rubber does indeed meet the road on these cells or if it is as Hovnimrsk Prdelac pointed out.

VirtualGathis
21st July, 2014 @ 09:28 am PDT

It's not "salt water powered" at all. But most of us knew that.

Captain Obvious
21st July, 2014 @ 10:42 am PDT

nickel metal hydride batteries are coming soon the pattent that the oil company Texaco bought and then suppressed the large format versions (LF) for last 15 years runs out at end of 2014.

1. Charges from 40%-80% in ONLY 15 min,

2. If operatedonly within the 40%-80% can last decades according to Toyota

3. Range over 120 miles with only 14 LF batteries as shown in EV1

4. Some news (owned by super rich oily persons) have already started anti NiMh "stories" saying they pollute landfills; not mentioning that Ni is so valuable that is recycled when finally they need it.

5. Ask why the frantic fear of this the only LF battery prevented from the market, surely the would be as afraid other batteries Unless this one really is that good.

6 Rav4 EV'S from 1998 are still onthe road with original NiMh batteries!

InventPeace
21st July, 2014 @ 10:58 am PDT

Is this process cheaper then H2 fuel cell mode?

Mass produce for use worldwide, awesome

Stephen N Russell
21st July, 2014 @ 03:12 pm PDT

Such a shameless use of readers time to post this lying article without any proof or technical data. This was a mislead waste of my time.

Helder António Pinheiro
21st July, 2014 @ 05:42 pm PDT

Magnetic air cars - remember that? I went to some of their meetings in San Jose. It was hard to keep a straight face. They were to use air amplification (a valid phenomena) but were initially vague on the actual energy source. Magnets was one answer and then confidence was placed in zero-point energy.

What is the energy source for the electric motors in the vehicles in this article?

-dphiBbydt
21st July, 2014 @ 11:20 pm PDT

If they really did make a giant leap in battery technology they would become trillionares selling batteries instead of limiting their battery tech to only super cars sold to a couple hundred people. From the other article kalqlate linked:

"Understandably, Nanoflowcell isn't divulging the full recipe for its flow battery or electrolytes. In its introductory video, it describes the solutions simply as salt water. La Vecchia confirmed that the full truth is a bit more complex, as the electrolytes contain a mix of metal salts and other ingredients."

It definitely reeks of nonsense looking for a sucker to fund it. I did find a wiklipedia article on Flow batteries here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_battery

From that data it looks like an average fluid energy density of of 50-80 Wh/L can be expected. Compare that to Nickel–cadmium at 50–150 Wh/L and Lithium Ion at 100 to 250 Wh/kg

Also from searching it looks like the initial batteries used in the Tesla Roadster were 117 Wh/kg and the Panasonic batteries in the Model S are 240 Wh/kg. This also explains why Tesla announced an updated pack available for the Roadster at the end of this year.

Daishi
22nd July, 2014 @ 12:59 am PDT

Needless to say, it doesn't run on common "salt," but 2 electrolyte solutions with a metal salt in 2 different oxidation states - possible vanadium, although there are other choices, including non-metallic organic solutions of quinone/hydroquinone, which is much cheaper. Always seems odd to me that inventor/innovators concentrate on producing a vehicle that is in the super car category, when all we need is a small family car that costs little to run.

GeoffG
22nd July, 2014 @ 01:35 am PDT

“InventPeace” is a mis-informed conspiracy theory “true believer”, who should be made aware of the following facts before worshiping at the feet of Nickel Metal Hydride batteries:

NiMH batteries are larger and heavier than Li-ion batteries. Lighter battery packs with higher energy density make it easier to get a car moving.

While Li-ion and NiMH batteries actually hold a similar amount of power, the charge time of NiMH is 10 to12 hours while the charge time for Li-ion is 1 to 3 hours and Lithium-ion batteries are less affected by memory effect, have a significantly lower Self-discharge rate and can tolerate lower temperature and warmer environments that a NiMH battery, and also, each NiMH AA cell can only give 1.2v compared to Li-ion Cells which can give 3.7v.

Also, “salcen” misses the point entirely. It's not about the car, it's about the use of the NanoFlowcel as a power source.

The Quant e-Sportlimousine is a method to demonstrate this concept. Whether using this type of flow cell technology as a power source will actually work as stated is another thing entirely.

As for “-dphiBbydt” who asks: “What is the energy source for the electric motors in the vehicles in this article?”, he should re-read the article where he will find, in the second sentence of the first paragraph in the article, the words:

“The car, which uses an electrolyte flow cell power system”

And then, in the first sentence of paragraph 5, he will find the words:

“We are delighted as pioneers to be able to present an automobile driven by flow cell technology” and then again, in the first sentence of paragraph 6, he would read:

“The flow cell system powering the Quant e-Sportlimousine's four electric motors develops electricity from an electrochemical reaction created by two electrolyte solutions”.

And finally “Daishi”, who says:

“If they really did make a giant leap in battery technology they would become trillionares selling batteries instead of limiting their battery tech to only super cars sold to a couple hundred people” should ALSO re-read the article where he will find, in the second last paragraph, the words:

"The potential of the NanoFlowcell is much greater, especially in terms of domestic energy supplies as well as in maritime, rail and aviation technology. The NanoFlowcell offers a wide range of applications as a sustainable, low cost and environmentally-friendly source of energy".

Xander77
23rd July, 2014 @ 12:19 pm PDT

Electric car technology runs on salt water. Amazing

Cynthia Agard
24th July, 2014 @ 04:50 pm PDT

2014 and fossil fuel STILL the predominant fuel for the planet. Such a shameful wrongdoing. what does 100 years of recent history tell us about technological breakthroughs and discoveries that threaten a monopoly? They are vehmently opposed and surpressed. All you nay sayers regarding the technology of what is possible want to look at what has been invented that you have never even heard about. Its happening and its been happening for a while. Governments especially sit on technology that you would not believe. Thats why people like Elon Musk from Tesla gave away his patents..its because he knows whats up!.. Drastic action is needed or we will forever be beholding to these greedy corporatist pigs who have scant regard for life on this planet only caring about fat $ bills. (oil companies)

Sir Wigglesworth
2nd August, 2014 @ 03:50 am PDT

As someone who has been studying how mankind can clean up the oceans with self-powering drone technology, this is very exciting news.

Think how wonderful it would be to have “skimming drones” going throughout our oceans 24/7, not only removing the millions & millions of tons of our garbage we dumped into the sea but also using that garbage as an energy source.

Yes, yes we can!

Bob Connors
31st August, 2014 @ 05:17 pm PDT

This is great news and hopefully it will take off.

To those saying things about the "batteries", from the article (if you had actually read it):

"The flow cell system powering the Quant e-Sportlimousine's four electric motors develops electricity from an electrochemical reaction created by two electrolyte solutions. This electricity is forwarded to super capacitors where its stored and distributed."

Super Caps are stable, old proven technology. They offer fast charge and slow discharge. Also have a much higher cycle life than batteries.

Joe Mason
3rd September, 2014 @ 07:43 pm PDT

LOL too funny, People will believe anything. It reminds me of the thin film solar company that said they could make super cheap solar sales to put on roofs. Tons of idiots and governments invested in the company and then the owners took the money and ran all the way to south east asia. Yes you can store energy in salt water, we have known this for some time. BUT, the amount of power and is so small that the the system they are demonstrating couldn't power the lights, let alone the pumps to move the water, and certainly could never move the car an inch. I am sure everyone has pointed this out, but I just had to ad my 2cents.

Mantion
25th September, 2014 @ 10:24 pm PDT
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