Decision time? Check out our latest product comparisons

ProDot makes your camera's shutter button more tactile

By

November 19, 2012

ProDot is an adhesive silicone dot which attaches to the shutter-button of your camera, an...

ProDot is an adhesive silicone dot which attaches to the shutter-button of your camera, and is said to make it more tactile

Image Gallery (4 images)

Can a little silicone dot which attaches over your camera's shutter button really help you take better photos? That's the claim from the makers of the ProDot, a tactile shutter release button which is currently doing the rounds on Kickstarter, and it appears many photographers think it could live up to the promise … because it sailed past its funding target in a matter of days.

ProDot is an adhesive silicone dot which attaches to the shutter-button of your camera, and is said to make it more tactile while providing more precise control and vibration dampening. This is claimed to allow more accurate shooting and less camera shake, meaning better quality photos, especially when shooting at slower shutter speeds.

Offering functionality similar to the soft release buttons favored by many rangefinder-shooters, the ProDot from Custom SLR features a raised textured surface for your trigger finger, and attaches to the camera thanks to a 3M adhesive. It can be re-applied several times before losing its stickiness.

Other benefits of the ProDot are said to be that, because of the molded textured surface, you're less likely to see your finger slip on the shutter button even in moist environments. It should also offer more comfort for long shooting sessions – likely to be welcomed by wildlife and event shooters – acting like a cushion for your shutter finger.

While the ProDot was designed with photographers in mind, it's also suggested it could be used on any number of items – from iPads and computer mice, where it could give users a more comfortable no-slip grip, to devices used by the elderly, where it could be used to make buttons easier to find.

A pledge of US$15 on Kickstarter gets you three ProDots (one red, one black and one clear) with delivery expected in the second half of December 2012.

Here's the Kickstarter video from the ProDot team.

Source: Kickstarter

About the Author
Simon Crisp Simon is a journalist and photographer who has spent the last ten years working for national UK newspapers - but has never hacked a mobile phone - and specializes in writing about weird products and photography technology. When not writing for Gizmag, Simon is often found playing with LEGO and drinking far too much coffee.   All articles by Simon Crisp
Tags
6 Comments

$15 ? ? Cmon. This is smart but too expensive. I use a square of one side of velcro. Sometime the soft fuzzy type like on the off button of my alarm clock to be able to find it easy in the dark. Sometimes the hook side if I need it real durable.

The Hoff
19th November, 2012 @ 04:36 pm PST

$15 dollars for 10 would barely be sane. It's a sticker with a tiny bit of silicone. Granted, it's a good idea. But that price is outrageous for what it is.

Karl Harmon
19th November, 2012 @ 06:35 pm PST

One word: Sugru. http://sugru.com/

One sachet of Sugru would make about 20 of these, and you can use the rest of the packs to fix everything else you've got that needs tweaking.

Synchro
20th November, 2012 @ 03:48 am PST

What a superfluous, overpriced piece of uselessness! If there's one button on a DSLR that I have no trouble finding, it's the shutter button. The semipro camera I own has a featherlight touch button with no descernible clicks, so as to not shake the camera any more than necessary.

Joris van den Heuvel
20th November, 2012 @ 09:43 am PST

The first impression reviews on CNET and PopPhoto look encouraging. I mean its essentially $5 bucks each. Pretty cheap for any photographer.

AaronQ
30th November, 2012 @ 08:27 am PST

Just received mine and its sweet. Works as advertised. Might have to try their glide strap next.

Marlo
26th December, 2012 @ 03:57 pm PST
Post a Comment

Login with your gizmag account:

Or Login with Facebook:


Related Articles
Looking for something? Search our 29,151 articles