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Pro-X Walker adds a workout to your waist pack

By

February 22, 2013

Get your arms more involved in the walk

Get your arms more involved in the walk

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One of the common excuses for not exercising enough is lack of time. Work, family, friends, volunteering ... avoiding exercise to take a nap – all these things combine to leave little time for toning the temple. Fitness gurus have responded by designing equipment and activities that work more muscles and burn more calories in less time. The case in point – Pro-X Walker – gets your arms working on a walk, at home, at the office – even while lying down and watching TV.

Some runners and walkers already use waist packs to carry water, snacks, phone, keys and other belongings. The Pro-X Walker takes this familiar form but adds spring activated cables to the belt. The cables are grasped with grab handles and provide resistance to work and tone the arms. A walker's arms already sway while walking; the Pro-X just takes advantage of this movement to up the fitness level.

German manufacturer Carl Stahl Kromer GmbH markets the Pro-X Walker as an alternative to Nordic walking. Like Nordic walking, it provides a fuller workout than walking alone, getting the arms, shoulders and back involved. Its smaller, multi-functional package will certainly prove more convenient to some folks versus long, single-purpose poles. It can also be used at home, on a treadmill, at the office and pretty much anywhere you have the space and time to sway your arms. Twelve exercises have been devised for the device, with input from a physiotherapist.

The Pro-X is available in "Smart" and "Strong" resistance models for €59.90 (approx. US$79 at time of publishing). An optional utility belt with extra storage and water bottle holder can be added for an extra €10 ($13).

Source: Pro-X Walker

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
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4 Comments

It's great if you are a young attractive woman but if you are 40 pounds overweight especially a young male, walking around with your arms swinging on cords is like wearing a sign saying:

"Please laugh and point at me. Perhaps tie me up with my cords, pull down my sweats and steal my wallet if you have time."

Snake Oil Baron
22nd February, 2013 @ 12:57 pm PST

Why not hook it up with a dyno that can charge your phone and MP3 player and stuffs?

Tonghowe Seeto
24th February, 2013 @ 04:50 pm PST

This isnt bad as far as exercise contraptions, but as the baron mentioned its not quite something you will want to walk around the block with in public without looking a tad ridiculous, but i think this would be good to add if you used a treadmill to get more out of your workout without having to run(some people for various reasons cant take the impact of running).

That being said i wonder how well it would work with running.

Arahant
26th February, 2013 @ 02:22 am PST

This might work with some side-to-side motion, but anything going up might make the belt shift up, and anything fore/aft might cause the belt to rotate around the waist. One could cinch that puppy up, but that skinny belts could be uncomfortable. I prefer walking with dumbells (the weights, not a person). I have 5 excercises that are currently done with 5-pound units (8 then 10 pounds coming soon). Snake Oil Baron nailed this one.

Bruce H. Anderson
4th March, 2013 @ 09:25 am PST
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