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Porsche 911 leather steering wheel for PC and PS3

By

April 28, 2008

Fanatec's Porsche 911 Turbo Racing Wheel

Fanatec's Porsche 911 Turbo Racing Wheel

April 29, 2008 Gamers have long been able to take their dream ride for a virtual spin, and now high-end input device producer Fanatec is offering Porsche fans and gamers alike an authentic look and feel with the introduction of the Porsche 911 Turbo Racing Wheel for PC and Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3). The leather-covered wheel features a tuning display that allows gamers to change settings like sensitivity or Force Feedback during gameplay. A Mabuchi RS 550 Motor is responsible for the extra strong Force Feedback effects with additional Force Feedback actuators in the wheel used to stimulate motor vibrations.

The wheel also features an adjustable turning angle whereby changes can be made directly on the wheel to 900°, 360°, 180° or in 1° steps by software. There are 2 separate shifters – sequential and 6+1 speed H-pattern with realistic shifting feel – and illuminated buttons show different symbols whether the wheel is connected to a PlayStation or PC. The unit offers gamers latency free wireless USB technology for the wheel and pedals and smooth belt drive to help to deliver improved realism. Also included with the unit is a 1GB USB flash drive in the shape of a Porsche key, which stores the wheel driver and manual. The wireless pedals feature a realistic clutch pedal with declining resistance and brake with soft-stop while the wheel itself is covered with fine, automotive grade leather to delivers a genuine Porsche racing feeling when playing games such as Gran Turismo 5: Prologue, Racedriver: GRID and rFactor.

The Porsche 911 Turbo Racing Wheel will be available exclusively from Fanatec’s website from early May for USD$349.99.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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