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Piano Gloves let you tinkle the virtual ivory

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May 31, 2010

Scott Garner and his Piano Gloves prototype

Scott Garner and his Piano Gloves prototype

Would-be Liberaces could soon be wearing a keyboard on their hands in the form of the Piano Gloves. Created by Scott Garner, the prototype gloves let the wearer play a piano on any surface via buttons on the tips of the fingers. Audio is processed via an Arduino microcontroller wired to the buttons and presently the software can be set to play a major scale or ten semitones, which would limit the gloves to playing tunes comprised of ten or less notes, but Scott is looking at ways to expand the repertoire.

The project is still in the early stages of development, but Scott has some ideas of ways to widen the range of notes available. A couple of possibilities include using the thumb as a kind of shift key for producing sharps and flats, or using two fingers to take the notes up or down an octave or change the instrument. He would also like to replace the buttons on the tips of the fingers with more expensive pressure pads, which would improve the feel of the gloves.

When Scott has refined his Piano Gloves, users might be able to combine them with the Concert Hands to be tinkling the virtual ivory like a virtuoso in no time wherever there is a flat surface available.

Via designboom.

Piano Gloves from Scott Garner on Vimeo.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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4 Comments

Is that supposed to be tickle? or are these gloves for use in the bathroom?

Also, it should read '10 or fewer notes' since notes are not a continuous quantity like liquid. Maybe Gizmag could hire someone with some writing skills instead of first year interns.

PizzaEater
1st June, 2010 @ 08:10 am PDT

"Would-be Liberaces"

Liberaces? lol Wow we're in the 21rst century Mr. Quick.

If you're going to date yourself, how about at least Elton Johns or Keith Emersons. ; )

yrag
1st June, 2010 @ 11:11 am PDT

It's "tickle". Not "tinkle". ;-)

Rolf Hawkins
1st June, 2010 @ 11:27 am PDT

I won't shit can this, because I have never met the guy or used the invention.

However - I will say this:

Yes I have played a giant Steinway stage grand piano. Fantastic. Wonderful - HUUUUUUGE and HEAVY and and and and and...

I recently bought a cheapish (cough cough) Casio CDP digital piano. Small, Light, takes up little space, easy to transport, and always stays in tune.

In reflection of this invention - I think playing "virtual piano's" would be much like "on special" roll up vinyl keyboards - or worsera, having virtual sex with a space helmet and gloves.

No thanks... I want the flesh to wrestle and the instrument to finger; because no matter how much you "authenticate the artificial experience" - only REAL is REAL and "NOT real" is always going to be "NOT real".

And weighted keys do not feel the same as holographs and 3D positional systems with electrical contacts.

Mr Stiffy
1st June, 2010 @ 09:55 pm PDT
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