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— Games

The British Army's 'Game of War' circa 1890 coming up for auction

By - August 20, 2010 5 Pictures
If you’re a fan of the military strategy game Risk, then you definitely might be interested in this: on October 13th, Bonhams Auction House in London will be selling off an “extremely rare” copy of The Game of War, a complex military board game dating from 1890. Unlike Risk, which is played for amusement and to shed excess friends, The Game of War was designed to be played by real military officers, to train them for the upcoming First World War. It was based on Kriegsspiel, a war game invented by Lieutenant Georg von Reiswitz in the early 19th century for training officers in the Prussian army. If you’re interested, however, be sure to stop by the bank machine on your way there – the game is expected to fetch between £1,500 to £2000, or US$2,330 to $3,100. Read More
— Science

Getting inside the mind of a terrorist to prevent attacks

By - August 20, 2010
Recently, 29 students from Northwestern University in Illinois planned a terrorist attack. Researchers from the university were subsequently able to learn details of the attack, even though the students never admitted to anything. How was this possible? Well, essentially, the researchers read the students’ minds. More specifically, they monitored their P300 brain waves – brief electrical patterns in the cortex, which occur when meaningful information is presented to someone with “guilty knowledge.” In this case, it was a mock planned attack, but the research team believe their process could be used to prevent the real thing. Read More
— Environment

Restaurant chain tracks carbon footprint of all its menu items

By - August 20, 2010 3 Pictures
A vegetarian diet, according to its proponents, has a lighter ecological footprint, reduced resource impacts, and lower carbon emissions than the non-vegetarian equivalent. A new fast-casual vegetarian restaurant chain, however, is taking “eating green” to a whole new level. Otarian, which already has locations in New York and opens in London this Friday, is the first global chain to carbon footprint all of its menu items according to the internationally recognized PAS 2050 standard. Not only can diners see the carbon figures for each item listed on the menu, but foods that generate too large of a footprint are simply not offered. The restaurant is also testing out the World Resources Institute's new product carbon foot printing standard, which Otarian claims “will help diners to understand the environmental impact of their food choices in a highly measurable and quantifiable way.” Read More
— Digital Cameras

Nikon goes full HD with the D3100 digital SLR

By - August 20, 2010 12 Pictures
As the rumor mill hit fever pitch, Nikon chose to announce the successor to its popular D3000 entry-level digital SLR. The new D3100 is Nikon's first digital SLR to record full 1080p high definition video and also features full time autofocus. Its sensor has been increased to 14.2 megapixels, the sensitivity range given a huge boost and users can now frame shots via the LCD display as well as the viewfinder. Read More
— Aircraft

Sennheiser's innovative 26 series headsets for professional pilots

By - August 20, 2010
We're familiar with Sennheiser's high-end headphones when it comes to enjoying music, but the company also has a history in specialist aviation audio gear that stretches back over two decades. One of the latest additions to this range is the 26 series – headsets aimed at commercial pilots which are notable not only for some clever design elements that protect hearing whilst ensuring that the person in charge of getting you to back on the ground safely can hear everything clearly. Read More
— Urban Transport

Kia Electric POP Commuter Vehicle Concept

By - August 20, 2010 5 Pictures
The continued trend towards smaller and lighter urban commuter vehicles continued today with Kia showing glimpses of an all-new electric concept car it will reveal at the Paris Show on September 30. Called the ‘POP’, Kia’s three-meter, three-seater was styled at Kia’s Russelsheim design studio where head of design Peter Schreyer has been husbanding the revitalization of the Kia family DNA. Read More
— Music

“SHamp” sound hold amplifier gives acoustic guitars an extra kick

By - August 20, 2010 2 Pictures
Guitarists who like to bring a little music to city streets and maybe make a bit of extra cash on the side face the problem of having their tunes drowned out by traffic noise or carried away on the wind. Traditional amplifiers requiring a power source are no help and while there are battery-powered units around, we don’t think any are as elegant or convenient as the solution developed by Laurie Nicoll of Victoria, Australia. His sound hole amplifier, or “SHamp” is a compact amplifier that fits into the sound hole of an acoustic guitar to give it that bit of extra oomph when you need it. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Sanyo releases very Flip-like HD pocket-size dual camera

By - August 20, 2010 6 Pictures
Sanyo's new pocket camera clearly takes aim at the Flip, while at the same time liberally borrowing inspiration from its success. The design moves away from previous Xacti gun-shaped designs and adopts a more Flip-like form factor, even including the signature pop-out USB connector from which Flip takes its name. Assuming that Sanyo didn't infringe on any patents here, we're excited that the company sees the value and marketability of simple cameras with few buttons. That was the common appeal of the Flip, and that same simplicity might help Sanyo take a bite out of the pocket-camera/camcorder market. Read More
— Computers

Samsung's S2 Portable 3.0 external HDD with USB 3.0 and 7200RPM spindle speed

By - August 19, 2010 3 Pictures
The trickle of USB 3.0 devices hitting the market is steadily increasing and will no doubt be a flood before too long. Portable hard drives are likely to be big sellers and Samsung is helping to get the ball rolling by announcing its new 2.5-inch external HDD, the S2 Portable 3.0. The drive features an on-board SuperSpeed USB 3.0 interface and a 7200RPM spindle speed to slash the time spent watching a progress bar crawl across the screen when moving files. Read More
— Around The Home

Sharp lights the way with LED ceiling lights

By - August 19, 2010 2 Pictures
Low-voltage halogen downlights are among the most commonly used globes in the world. Despite the low voltage moniker they aren’t very energy efficient, generally producing around the same amount of greenhouse gas as a 60-watt incandescent globe. While there are plenty of environmentally friendly alternatives to incandescent globes, finding a greener alternative for recessed lighting offers less options. Sharp is providing another, however, with its thin design LED ceiling lights. Read More
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