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New "internal bra" promises better-lasting breast lift results

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May 19, 2014

Orbix is offering a new type of breast-lift procedure that supposedly offers better-lastin...

Orbix is offering a new type of breast-lift procedure that supposedly offers better-lasting results that traditional procedures

A new procedure promises to lift and support women's breasts with better-lasting results than traditional methods. The Orbix Breast Support System uses thin silicone straps attached to the ribs to provide support. Orbix says the technique "eliminates breast re-sagging and minimizes scarring."

Breasts often begin to dip between the ages of 35 and 40, and the process can be accelerated by weight-gain and breastfeeding. Although often deemed an exercise in vanity, breast lift procedures can have a positive mental effect on patients.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), the number of breast lift procedures are growing at twice the rate of breast implant procedures and have increased by 70 percent since 2000. The ASPS says that over 90,000 breast lift procedures were carried out by its practitioners alone in 2013.

Despite this, CEO of Orbix Yossi Mazel says that existing breast lift procedures will often not stop the breast from beginning to sag again afterwards. Mazel says that the new approach by Orbix can stop this.

"The device is an internal support to the breasts," he explains. "What essentially is holding the breasts in position is the skin, but the skin loses its elasticity over time and the breasts gravitate downwards."

Traditional approaches rely on the newly "lifted" skin to support the breasts, which can begin to sag again as the skin continues to lose elasticity. In contrast, the Orbix Breast Support System uses a silicone strap that is attached at each end to two places on one of the patient's ribs, supporting each breast "like a hammock" or "internal bra".

Mazel explains that the idea was invented by a plastic surgeon who wanted to overcome the disappointment from patients of traditional procedures with unsustainable results. The lengthy development procedure looked at what materials would be appropriate, what different forces act upon the breasts that the device must withstand (such as walking, running, and playing sports), and what strength of material is required to ensure it can manage those forces for many years.

In addition to longer-lasting results that help to maintain the shape of the breast for many years, Orbix claims that its Support System shows better healing and reduced scarring compared to traditional procedures. It also says that the procedure is easy for existing practitioners to carry out and that it should last indefinitely without detriment, although checkups are advised every five years.

The first clinical trials, carried out by Prof. Mustafa Hamdi, were held in Belgium during 2009. Since then, over 50 procedures have been carried out in Europe, with patients in Germany, Sweden, UK, Israel, and France. The product has gained the CE mark for its sale in Europe and the commercial rollout has begun in a handful of countries. In the UK, highly regarded plastic surgeon Jian Farhadi is carrying out the first procedures.

Mazel reports high levels of satisfaction amongst patients who have already undergone the procedure, though some medical experts have urged caution and called for further trials to assess any potential long-term side-effects.

"CE marking only refers to the safety in the sense of the materials itself, the actual product," Professor Kefah Mokbel of the London Breast Institute told the MailOnline. "But it does not mean the procedure is safe. Yes, this procedure is exciting but we must look at its efficacy and safety in the long term."

Source: Orbix

About the Author
Stu Robarts Stu is a tech writer based in Liverpool, UK. He has previously worked on global digital estate management at Amaze and headed up digital strategy for FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology). He likes cups of tea, bacon sandwiches and RSS feeds.   All articles by Stu Robarts
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5 Comments

Part of the concern over the long-term affects may be related to present concerns of wearing a bra. http://www.naturalnews.com/045200_American_Cancer_Society_Komen_Foundation_bras.html#

According to the article, tight brassieres cause "lymphatic constriction" which can have detrimental side affects. Going bra-less can help, and some suggest regular massage to encourage breast health. The Orbix system may need to be accompanied by specific guidelines about regular massage. There are probably counter arguments as well.

Bruce H. Anderson
20th May, 2014 @ 12:51 pm PDT

This seems to be a very innovative procedure for those that want a younger looking figure but really, "silicone straps attached to the ribs", what do they do, screw the straps to the ribs, yuck, sounds horrible.

I realize that there will always be a demand for enhancements to the body in one form or another but do we really need them or is this another case of simple vanity.

I imagine that similar techniques could be applied to face lifts, butt lifts and so on and using the same material could be beneficial in healing and support after injuries.

Well if women really want this well so be it and I am happy to enjoy the result, but do we really need this, I personally think not.

Dan.

Facebook User
20th May, 2014 @ 09:49 pm PDT

The question here is not whether we 'need' this technology.

Noel K Frothingham
21st May, 2014 @ 02:43 am PDT

Great technology and it's about time, this has always been a huge concern of mine.

Jay Finke
22nd May, 2014 @ 06:09 am PDT

Sorry, this is the kind of thing that should cause a 'doctor's hippocratic oath to be revoked. This is not curing a problem. And what long term studies have been done to see how this affects these ribs that are holding up the hammock.

It's very telling that the comments so far seem to be from 'guy' points of view... but this is one guy that loves a real woman as she is in mind, spirit and body.

Best regards,

Jeff

Jeff in PT
22nd May, 2014 @ 05:12 pm PDT
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