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Marine

Largest ever Wally mega yacht sold

August 9, 2007 The Wally 50m is the first mega yacht of this size completely built with advanced composites, and after the sale of the Wally 101 last April and the Wally 100.3 two weeks ago, the Wally 50m yacht (the largest Wally so far) has already been signed. A blue-water sloop combining all the comforts and amenities of a mega yacht with the Wally performance and ease of handling, the Wally 50m will feature PBO rigging and a lifting keel, increasing the draft to 6 m when sailing, from 4.2 meter when motoring, anchoring and entering ports.  Read More

The Surfango PowerKayak

August 2, 2008 Unless you happen to be shooting a raging white-water rapid the prospect of reaching speeds anywhere near 25mph is not something normally associated with kayaking – but swap paddle power for a 9.5hp engine and the whole game changes. We’ve covered a menagerie of fun watersports machines recently, from the amphibious Quadski to the Aquajet Jetbike, all aimed at injecting a serious dose of thrills into aquatic activities and the latest to catch our attention - Surfango’s PowerKayak - is no exception. The PowerKayak mates the body of a kayak with a fun little 4-stroke engine to deliver a 25mph top speed and the ability to explore lakes and rivers with no regard for what the wind and current are doing.  Read More

Riva Racing's supercharger kit for the STX-15F turns the stock jet-ski into a race-ready, ...

July 31, 2007 Any jet-ski boasting a stroked-out, 1500cc motor straight from the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-12R should be treated with extreme caution – but since the 250-horsepower Jet Ski Ultra 250X was released, owners of the STX-15F have been feeling a little left behind. Not to worry – nothing succeeds like excess in the petrol head world - and the aftermarket has stepped in with a bolt-on supercharger capable of turning the STX-15F into a 330-horsepower aquatic widow-maker that can launch you and a horrified passenger to 60mph nearly as fast as a road-going superbike, leaving your 250X-riding buddies gasping in your wake.  Read More

Sealegs 7.1m amphibious boat commences production

July 19, 2007 Sealegs new 7.1 metre amphibious boat is about to commence volume production following successful sea trials. The NZ$98,000 (US$77,600) 7.1m Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) is the third and largest model released by the amphibious boat manufacturer and is expected to attract a lot of interest from tourism and water transportation operators. Its obvious strength is the additional space, which enables eight adults to be comfortably seated within its 700kg payload. It has a top land speed of 10 kph and with an 115hp motor can do up to 78 kph on water.  Read More

Seakeeper stabilization technology (www.seakeeper.com)

July 13, 2007 The experience of cruising the ocean waves is a joy for some, but as anyone who suffers from sea sickness can attest, it can also be completely unbearable. Boats pitch, roll and yaw much like aircraft and to counter the disorientation this causes to our bodies gyroscopic stability systems and trim tabs have been developed to combat the rolling seas. Seakeeper is one company addressing this issue through the research and development of stability devices for small boats under 100 feet that include products for both low and high speeds. The company has developed different systems depending on the size of their craft and how it is used. The first is a gyroscopic stability system designed to combat what’s considered the worst part of the boating experience - low speed boat roll - and the second is a stability system that makes use of sensor-adjusted small control surfaces (like a more advanced form of the traditional trim tabs) that adjusts the motion of a boat moving at speed and improves comfort, handling, and safety.  Read More

The Sealegs amphibious boat

July 12, 2007 Since the last time we caught up with the Kiwis behind Sealegs, the amphibious boat that can drive itself straight down into the water, worldwide sales have taken off. The eye-catching vehicle is a fully functional boat that drops "landing gear" much like a small plane to drive out of the water and overland at up to 6mph (10kph). Sealegs showcased their latest model in Australia recently at the Melbourne Boat Show - a 6.1 metre aluminium D-tube version that's essentially a ruggedized rigid inflatable - a bit heavier and around AUD$10K (US$8,600) more expensive than its predecessor, but it's a complete turnkey amphibious solution with extra armor for avid adventurers. A drive on trailer is now also available that adds high speed land transport to the equation.  Read More

The Floating Dry Dock

July 12, 2007 Boat owners who keep their boats moored know all too well what a hassle it can be to regularly remove accumulated plants, algae and sea-creatures from their hulls - a process known as antifouling. The conventional approach is to periodically use expensive and time consuming boat lifts and dry storage to clean the hull, but an alternative is available that achieves the same objective without removing the boat from the water. Known as the Floating Dry Dock, this solution uses an inflatable protective skin to keep the boat dry while moored, providing a fast, cost-effective, drive-in/drive-out way to by-pass the need for antifouling.  Read More

Hobie Sailyak trimaran offers unique sail/pedal combination

July 9, 2007 Hobie is a name that’s been associated with innovation in aquatic sports since Hobie Alter started creating boards for the fledgling sport of surfing in his father's garage more than half a century ago - and this latest creation is no exception. A true “best of both worlds” invention, this unique cross between a pedal powered kayak and a trimaran adds an entirely new dimension to sailing. The Hobie Mirage Adventure Island is a 16-foot, single-person “Sail/yak” that combines the Hobie MirageDrive pedal-propulsion system with a 5.38 square meter sail and two amas (outriggers) that provide stability on the water and fold back into the hull for docking and beaching.  Read More

High-tech sails to benefit commercial shipping

July 5, 2007 UPDATED IMAGES For four hundred years majestic tall ships ruled the world’s oceans carrying cargo and migrants to far corners of the globe, but the advent of steam power in the late 19th century brought the golden age of sail to an end and rendered wind-powered vessels obsolete – but did it? Recent projects in both Europe and the U.S are seeking to breathe new life into this “old technology” and once again give sail-power a viable role in commercial shipping. The new era of sail-power wont see the return of square rigged barques or clipper ships, but rather the introduction of high-tech kite sails that generate greater propulsion power than conventional sails. These can be used to supplement the propulsion systems of all kinds of cargo vessels and in the process generate economic benefit, reduce reliance on fossil fuels and deliver emission reductions in a sector that has become one of the world’s biggest polluters.  Read More

The prizegiving ceremony

July 3, 2007 Alinghi finally won the 32nd America's Cup Match 5-2 this afternoon, winning its fourth consecutive race in dramatic fashion. The final race of the America's Cup was befitting of what has been the closest, most exciting America's Cup since the Cup was won by Australia II in1983, ending the longest winning streak in the history of sport 131 years. The skipper of Australia II, John Bertrand, was quoted at the time as saying, “this puts yacht racing back on the map!” His words were prophetic indeed, as the Cup is now the most expensive and technology infused peacetime contest other than Formula One. Emirates Team New Zealand spent much of the race ahead on the advantage line, but with Alinghi in strong tactical position on the right hand side of the race course. The Kiwis were never able to get a big enough lead to cross ahead and switch sides, finally crossing the line just one second behind Alinghi.  Read More

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