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Nomad promises a great cup of joe, on the go

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March 22, 2013

Nomad promises a great espresso, wherever you are – just add some hot water and ground cof...

Nomad promises a great espresso, wherever you are – just add some hot water and ground coffee

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It can be a challenge to procure a really great cup of coffee when you’re away from home, especially if you like to disappear off-grid on occasion. However, the Nomad by UniTerra promises a portable and compact espresso machine that will provide great coffee, wherever you are.

We’ve already covered plenty of portable coffee makers here at Gizmag, with the Java Commuter Press, and mypressi TWIST springing to mind as appealing options – so what sets Nomad apart from the rest? Well, in addition to an appealing compact design, the diminutive coffee machine sports that all-important classic pump lever which many aficionados of the black stuff reckon to be essential for a good brew.

The lever is coupled with a (removable) proprietary "True Crema Valve," and this combination is said to allow an unskilled barista to pour an excellent cup of espresso, even with lower-quality ground coffee.

Nomad's proprietary True Crema Valve is said to help produce an excellent cup of espresso,...

In order to make an espresso, you'll first need to provide Nomad with hot water and ground coffee, though no power is required by the unit itself. UniTerra states that the lever action can produce up to 10 bars of pressure (145 psi). The coffee machine measures roughly 15 x 15 x 15 cm (6 x 6 x 6 inches), with a weight of 1.1 kg (or 2.5 pounds), and there’s a maximum water capacity of 300 cc (10 oz.).

At present, Nomad is the subject of a Kickstarter campaign which ends on April 10. A minimum pledge of US$165 is required to snag an early black unit, though additional colors are also available from $215.

The promo video below features the obligatory pitch.

Source: UniTerra, Kickstarter

About the Author
Adam Williams Adam scours the globe from his home in North Wales in order to bring the best of innovative architecture and sustainable design to the pages of Gizmag. Most of his spare time is spent dabbling in music, tinkering with old Macintosh computers and trying to keep his even older VW bus on the road.

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4 Comments

I love the concept but the design looks bulky and looks like it has too much plastic on the inside with the hot water.

It looks like it needs a more portable version that can be taken apart or transform (robots in disguise) into something more space efficient.

That being said I would love to play with it someday.

Ben Tumaru O'Brien
23rd March, 2013 @ 10:14 am PDT

I hope the guy narrrating the video has not been using espresso from his own product.

Rex Martin
24th March, 2013 @ 10:52 am PDT

If you want a REAL espresso cup from a portable device, get yoursel this: http://www.amazon.com/Bialetti-Express-1-Cup-Stovetop-Espresso/dp/B0001SJH2I/ref=cm_cmu_pg__header

and maybe the smallest camping stove you can find, if you really want to be indipendet from other sources.

This Nomad is an interesting piece of design, but the italian moka is the only way to get a real homemade espresso where the boiling water takes the flavours out of the grond beans into the upper cup... In the Nomad you have to boil water first (in a separate pot/kettle) then pour it inside a (probably) "cold" device where it will be pumped into the coffee powder: water will be well below it's boiling point...

BTW, it's funny the "green" attribute: you still need some sort of energy to boil the water, don't you?

Giolli Joker
25th March, 2013 @ 04:56 am PDT

Perhaps you guys need to look at the so called "South India Coffee decoction" utensil used by millions of south Indian households of avid coffee drinkers. It too required only ground coffee and boiling hot water to genuinely make finest cup of espresso bar none.

BTW a personal sized one costs a mere US$ 1.50

pmshah
26th March, 2013 @ 10:20 pm PDT
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