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Nissan GTR sets ice speed record

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April 10, 2013

The GT-R captures Russia's ice speed record

The GT-R captures Russia's ice speed record

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The Nissan GT-R really didn't need a new speed record to remind us that it's a lotta car for a little buck – we remember that every time we look at its specs. But, in conjunction with LAV Productions company, Nissan went ahead and brought a specially outfitted GT-R to one of the coldest, least hospitable places on earth – Siberia – and returned with a new ice speed record.

Something about watching the world's fastest, sportiest cars rip across raw ice spikes our pulse, so we decided to ignore the fact that Nissan's ice record only relates to Russia and not the entire world (does every cold country really need its own ice speed record?). Bentley famously grabbed the world record of 205.5 mph two years ago in a specially outfitted Continental Supersports convertible.

While the GT-R's final number wasn't as high as Bentley's, the fact that the Japanese supercar did it without modification is impressive. Bentley attempted to keep modifications to a minimum, but did use a specially designed roll cage and braking parachute to increase safety. The GT-R was completely stock, according to Nissan. Plus, if there's one region on Earth where you should feel proud to own a non-world ice speed record, it'd have to be Siberia.

With Russian race car driver Roman Rusinov and auto journalist Andrey Leontjev seated inside its cabin, the 540-hp 2012 GT-R rolling non-studded Bridgestone winter tires hit 183 mph (294.8 km/h), bulleting across the frosty surface of the world's deepest lake, Lake Baikal.

The GT-R captures Russia's ice speed record

The GT-R reached that speed on a 1-km (0.62-mile) timekeeping section, wedged between 3.5 kilometers (2.2 miles) of designated acceleration area and 3.5 kilometers of braking zone. A specially formed committee of the Russian Automotive Federation and a group of four judges from around Russia oversaw the run.

It's easy to get caught up in numbers and formalities, forgetting that this feat was done on a deadly slick piece of solidified water that we wouldn't want to tip-toe across. The video below brings you back to the ice.

Source: Nissan

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
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6 Comments

200mph on ice. Because sometimes you really have to be the first one to the ice hole when the fish are bitin'

Vince Pack
10th April, 2013 @ 06:53 pm PDT

Its just not good enough if there is no ramp at the end to launch off.

For that matter, I wonder what the world record for height and distance through the air for a car.

Is anyone keen to take their lambo for a one way trip. Parachutes may be required.

Nairda
10th April, 2013 @ 10:50 pm PDT

Well,

A nice achievement but 294.8 km/h aint 335.7 km/h as set earlier this winter by Nokia Tyres:

http://www.nokiantyres.com/EN-Fastest-On-Ice-2013

Veli-Matti Tiainen
10th April, 2013 @ 11:58 pm PDT

My fav sub-$100k supercar just got cooler...get it.

Here in Canada we do this all the time...its called getting to the airport.

Angus MacKenzie
11th April, 2013 @ 12:20 am PDT

Pound for Dollars the GTR could be the best made sports car right out of the box! #gizmag

RG COLDWORLD
11th April, 2013 @ 10:32 am PDT

Awesome, did this in Iceland for 007 movie Die another Day sequence.

Stephen N Russell
11th April, 2013 @ 05:55 pm PDT
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