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Shippo: The brain-controlled tail that wags with your mood

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September 21, 2012

Shippo is a motorized tail that responds to the wearer's current emotional state by waggin...

Shippo is a motorized tail that responds to the wearer's current emotional state by wagging

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At this year’s Tokyo Games Show, Japanese purveyor of electronically-augmented fashion Neurowear unveiled the successor to its Necomimi brain-activated cat ears. It's called Shippo, and it's a brain-controlled motorized tail that responds to the user's current emotional state with corresponding wagging.

Apparently a translation of tail in Japanese, Shippo requires a NeuroSky electroencephalograph (EEG) headset, alongside a clip-on heart monitor, in order to observe brain activity and pick up on the user’s emotional state. This information is then translated to wagging, which will be soft and slow or hard and fast, depending on whether one is relaxing or excited/anxious. The EEG headset communicates with the fluffy appendage via a Bluetooth connection.

Shippo is a motorized tail that responds to the wearer's current emotional state with corr...

Shippo also features geotagging and smartphone sharing capability, which updates friends with the user’s current mood and location, in addition to allowing devotees of the wearable tech to seek out locations which like-minded people have flagged as making them feel relaxed and happy.

We've not yet heard definite pricing and availability details on Shippo, but will let you know when we do.

The surreal promo video below shows Shippo enabling two young people to meet with the use of the aforementioned geotagging feature.

Source: Neurowear via The Verge

About the Author
Adam Williams Adam is a tech and music writer based in North Wales. When not working, you’ll usually find Adam tinkering with old Macintosh computers, reading history books, or exploring the countryside with his dog Finley.   All articles by Adam Williams
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