A certain historical figure is reputed to have once turned water into wine, and whether you believe this event actually happened or not, the idea is a compelling one. Now, a wine expert and an entrepreneur claim that they have created a device that turns this concept into a reality. Just to ensure the connection is made, they have called the device the Miracle Machine.

The Miracle Machine, being brought to market by wine expert Kevin Boyer and entrepreneur Philip Vine, is a device capable of turning water into wine in a matter of days. Added to the water are a set of ingredients that includes grape concentrate, yeast, and a finishing powder that imbues the liquid with barrel-aged flavor.

The wine is fermented using a method the pair aren't willing to discuss, saying only that it involves "an array of electrical sensors, transducers, heaters and pumps." All of the components inside the Miracle Machine are connected to an Arduino microcontroller that ensures the process is happening as it should.

An accompanying app, linked to the Miracle Machine via Bluetooth, tracks the progress of the wine. It can also be used to select the perfect wine for your palette, telling you which ingredients to purchase in order to make the wine of your choice.

The Miracle Machine is due to be funded via Kickstarter, with interested parties invited to register for notification when the campaign goes live. The retail price of the Miracle Machine once it goes on general sale is listed at US$499.

The ingredients required to make the wine will be available through both the Miracle Machine website and Amazon. The cost of producing a single bottle of wine (that supposedly tastes like a $20 bottle) is estimated at $2, though the proof will be in the tasting once the Miracle Machine has been launched.

The video below shows the creators of the Miracle Machine discussing the device and their inspiration for developing it.

Source: The Miracle Machine

Editor's note:: Unbelievable? As it turns out, yes. The Miracle Machine is in actual fact a cleverly conceived (and well executed, judging by the number of outlets, including ourselves, who covered it) PR exercise for Wine To Water, a non-profit aid organization aiming to help provide clean water to people in need around the world. The true purpose behind the "invention" has now been revealed here.