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— Medical

Low-cost bioactive paper detects blood types in under a minute

Determining a blood type to ensure compatibility ahead of a transfusion isn't straightforward at the best of times, but in regions of the world where proper medical equipment is unavailable it is nigh on impossible. A new, bioactive piece of paper promises to change that, however, with the ability to analyze just a few drops of blood and identify somebody's blood group in as little as one minute.

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— Medical

Liquid metal "Nano-Terminators" could signal judgement day for cancer

Scientists are increasingly turning to nanoparticles in search of new ways to treat cancer. Tiny nanorobots that wade through the bloodstream and microscopic particles that blow up diseased cells are a couple of menacing examples. But none sound quite so ominous as a new technique under development at North Carolina State University (NCSU). Its researchers have designed liquid metal particles they describe as "Nano-Terminators" that latch onto cancer cells to more effectively deliver drugs that kill them off.

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— Medical

EyeGuide Focus is claimed to detect concussions in 10 seconds

Although concussions can have very serious consequences, they're also difficult to diagnose without the proper equipment. As a result, we've seen a variety of technologies aimed at helping athletic coaches to determine if players who have received knocks to the head are indeed concussed. One of the latest such systems, EyeGuide's Focus, promises to deliver results in just 10 seconds.

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— Medical

Kinect measures body thickness to lessen radiation exposure from X-rays

The depth-sensing capabilities of the Microsoft's Kinect has seen it put to use in a number of unexpected applications, such as helping Parkinson's sufferers to walk and the visually impaired to practice yoga. Scientists now claim to have expanded the applications for the gaming technology to include a more precise approach to X-ray imaging, which they say can limit exposure to radiation by measuring the thickness of a subject's body parts.

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— Medical

Scientists identify protein central to cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease

A study from researchers at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco has examined the protein BRCA1, using a combination of tests on laboratory mice and human brain tissue to determine that the protein is central to learning and retaining memories. The work highlights the importance of the protein in relation to the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease, and could help in the development of future treatments.

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