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Mazda’s eco-friendly next-generation engines to debut at Tokyo Motor Show

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September 30, 2009

Mazda's next-generation SKY-G and SKY-D engines

Mazda's next-generation SKY-G and SKY-D engines

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Mazda's “Technologies for Tomorrow” display at the upcoming Tokyo Motor show will see the premiere of its next-generation direct injection gasoline Mazda SKY-G engine and Mazda SKY-D clean diesel engine, which offer improved eco-friendliness and torque thanks to optimized combustion efficiency. Mazda will also reveal the first next-generation automatic transmission, the Mazda SKY-Drive, which offers first-rate fuel economy and a direct driving performance feel. As part of Mazda’s SKY concept, the new engines and transmission are designed to help Mazda achieve its goal of improving the average fuel economy of Mazda vehicles 30 percent by 2015, compared to 2008 levels, without sacrificing performance.

Direct-injection Mazda SKY-G petrol engine

The SKY-G is a next-generation, direct-injection petrol engine, which Mazda says achieves significantly improved fuel economy and output performance, due to enhanced thermal efficiency. The engine block is newly designed to reduce mechanical friction and achieve an optimal air-fuel mix, and a direct fuel-injection system is employed for the wide variety of spray profiles that are possible, enabling the maximum expansion ratio to be achieved.

The new engine improves fuel economy and torque by approximately 15 percent compared to Mazda’s current 2.0-liter engine. To achieve this, Mazda adopted next-generation fuel injectors and a highly functional variable-valve timing mechanism. Mazda claim the new engine offers the fuel economy equivalent of a Mazda2 in a larger vehicle the size of a Mazda3.

Clean diesel Mazda SKY-D engine

The new SKY-D clean diesel engine has been designed to offer high fuel economy and output performance while keeping emissions low. The newly-designed engine block reduces mechanical friction to the level of a petrol engine and, by optimizing the pressure and temperature in the cylinders, the shape of combustion chambers, and the fuel injection rate, combustion begins at the best timing in terms of thermal efficiency.

By employing piezo injectors, a two-stage turbocharger and other technologies, fuel economy becomes approximately 20 percent better than the current 2.2-liter diesel engine, allowing the new engine to achieve fuel economy equivalent of a current Mazda2 in a vehicle the size of a Mazda6.

SKY-Drive automatic transmission

Mazda says its SKY-Drive automatic transmission is highly efficient, contributes to substantially improved fuel economy, and delivers a more direct feel compared with the current unit. It improves fuel economy by approximately five percent, due to a complete redesign that significantly reduces mechanical friction, a revised torque converter and clutch with minimized slip, and an optimized lock-up mechanism. A rapid clutch action was achieved by identifying the minimum amount of fluid necessary, which also helped to realize a direct feel similar to a dual clutch transmission.

The next-generation SKY engines and automatic transmission will go on show alongside Mazda’s Kiyora concept car, while its “Future Technologies” exhibit will showcase the Mazda Premacy Hydrogen RE Hybrid, with its hydrogen-powered rotary engine, and various other vehicle technologies under development.

Gizmag will be at the 41st Tokyo Motor Show, which runs from October 24 to November 4, to bring you further details, so stay tuned.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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