Introducing the Gizmag Store

LifeBot 5 combines telemedicine essentials in one device

By

December 31, 2012

The military model of the LifeBot 5

The military model of the LifeBot 5

Image Gallery (2 images)

While people such as emergency medical technicians and army medics are true lifesavers, there are times when they could benefit from the resources or expertise of a hospital-based physician. That’s where all-in-one portable telemedicine units like the LifeBot 5 come into play.

Although the device isn’t the only one of its kind, the LifeBot company claims that it is “the world's smallest, lightest, most advanced portable mobile telemedicine system.”

Weighing in at 15 pounds (6.8 kg), it is able to monitor a patient’s heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature, plus it is capable of performing electrocardiography and ultrasound. It can also transmit video and audio. Future versions may additionally include a defibrillator.

A data transmission from a LifeBot 5 unit

A data transmission from a LifeBot 5 unit

Data is sent securely via 4G, 3G, LTE, WiMax, cellular, Wi-Fi, satellite, and/or data radio connections – the machine automatically selects whatever system(s) work best for the given situation. Remotely-located doctors are then able to view a patient’s vital signs and other data with a delay of only a few seconds, and offer real-time guidance to the on-site medical personnel. Multiple LifeBot units can also communicate with one another, allowing for collaborative efforts on difficult procedures.

The original version of the device was developed using Department of Defense grants of US$14 million from the Telemedicine and Technology Research Center and U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command.

Prices for the LifeBot 5 begin at under $20,000.

Source: LifeBot via Dvice

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
Tags
3 Comments

How long before this simply connects to a computer similar to Watson (from Jeopardy fame)?

sunfly
1st January, 2013 @ 12:56 pm PST

how much is the price?If it's more affordable,I can ask my principal to buy one for the ship.Thanks.

Florentino Torres
2nd January, 2013 @ 10:49 am PST

It's like a very enhanced version of the setup some EMTs had in the late 1970's.

Remember the TV show "Emergency!"? It showcased many of the latest developments in on scene emergency medical technology. Radioing an EKG signal to a hospital where a doctor could read it then prescribe treatment was a revolution in keeping people alive to make it to a hospital.

This box is a direct descendent of that early system.

Some other trivia about that show. One of the actors was actually a Los Angeles County firefighter. The badges used were genuine LACoFD and that firefighter brought them to the set each morning and took them back at the end of each day. One of the fire engines used was built by the studio to the same specifications as one would be built by a fire engine company, at much less cost. When the show ended it was given to LACoFD which used it for several years, then gave it back to the studio to use in their own fire department. The fire station seen in exterior shots was a real one and the interiors were shot on sets that exactly duplicated the interior of the real fire station.

Gregg Eshelman
2nd January, 2013 @ 06:52 pm PST
Post a Comment

Login with your gizmag account:

Or Login with Facebook:


Related Articles

Just enter your friends and your email address into the form below

For multiple addresses, separate each with a comma




Privacy is safe with us because we have a strict privacy policy.

Looking for something? Search our 26,455 articles