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Lenovo's new tablets bring the Yoga brand to Android

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October 30, 2013

Lenovo's new Yoga tablet doesn't flip and fold like its Windows Yogas, but it can be used ...

Lenovo's new Yoga tablet doesn't flip and fold like its Windows Yogas, but it can be used in three different 'modes'

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Most tablets look pretty similar. You could argue that this is because their iPad-like form factor makes the most sense. But Lenovo thinks there's still some room for variety. Take the company's new Yoga Android tablets, which add a cylindrical bulge and kickstand to the traditional tablet design.

The cylinder

The Yoga tablet in stand mode

Like Lenovo's Windows-running convertibles, the new 8-in and 10-in Yoga tablets can be used in several different modes. Here Lenovo's "multimode" approach is boiled down to "hold," "tilt," and "stand." The tablets are supposedly easier to hold, due to that bulging cylinder giving you an easy spot to grip. Tilt mode, meanwhile, is when you pop out its kickstand and set the tablet on a surface at a lower horizontal angle. Stand mode is when you shift the kickstand again to prop the device up at a higher vertical angle.

Of course you can do the stand and tilt modes with the iPad and any other tablet paired with a folding cover/stand, but the cylinder does offer one extra bonus. Lenovo stashed an extra battery inside that bulge, and it supposedly leads to some insane battery life. The company estimates a maximum of 18 hours for the new tablets. If that holds up in real-world use, then those are some unprecedented uptimes for a tablet.

Pixels and pricing

The 8-in and 10.1-in Yoga tablets have a mere 1280 x 800 resolution

Unfortunately, part of the reason the tablets have such crazy battery life is because their screens have some pretty mid-range resolution. Both models have 1280 x 800 displays, which comes out to 189 pixels per pinch (PPI) in the 8-in model, and a mere 149 PPI in the 10.1-in version. By comparison, the new iPad Air packs in 264 PPI, the Retina iPad mini has 326 PPI, and the 2013 Nexus 7 gives you 323 PPI. Unlike those tablets, you'll definitely see some pixels on these new Yogas.

The tablets' mid-range screens and questionable performance (they pack quad core Mediatek processors designed for budget tablets) may scare some customers away, but at least neither tablet will break the bank. The 8-in model retails for US$250, and the 10-in version will set you back $300.

If either of the Android 4.2-running slates tickles your fancy, then you can pick up both of them, starting today, at the source link below, as well as select online and brick & mortar retailers.

Product page: Lenovo

About the Author
Will Shanklin Will Shanklin is Gizmag's Mobile Tech Editor, and has been part of the team since 2012. Will has a Master's degree from U.C. Irvine and a Bachelor's from West Virginia University. He currently lives in New Mexico with his wife, Jessica.
  All articles by Will Shanklin
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