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Mercedes and LEGO team up for largest Technic model ever

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June 2, 2011

The LEGO Technic Unimog U 400

The LEGO Technic Unimog U 400

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LEGO's Technic line has been inspiring future engineers for around 30 years with kits that give kids of all ages the ability to create more advanced models than the standard LEGO blocks. LEGO has now teamed with Mercedes-Benz to create a Technic model based on the multi-purpose Unimog U 400 truck, which Mercedes calls "the world's most versatile workhorse." Comprising 2048 parts, the 1:12.5 scale "Universal-Motor-Geräts (tool)" model will be the largest LEGO Technic model ever released.

The LEGO Technic Unimog U 400

Reflecting the Unimog's wide variety of applications that include snow plowing and road construction, the Technic model features a pneumatically operated crane gripper arm that can rotate almost 360 degrees via an electrically controlled turntable, and a front winch that can be converted into a snow plow. Designed in cooperation with Mercedes, the model is accurate down to the engine pistons, portal axles and individual suspension that deadens jolts when taking the four-wheel drive vehicle off-road.

Coinciding with the 60th anniversary of the first Unimog rolling off the production line in 1951, the LEGO Technic Unimog U 400 will be available from August for around EUR190 (approx. US$260).

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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1 Comment

Dear Santa,

I have been really good boy all year...

Aquasparky
6th June, 2011 @ 03:48 am PDT
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