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LapTouch: a conceptual laptop for creative minds

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April 29, 2013

The LapTouch concept is targeted at the creative community (Image: Amir Labidi)

The LapTouch concept is targeted at the creative community (Image: Amir Labidi)

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Einstein famously maintained that a cluttered desk is a sign of a brilliant mind. However, for many modern designers the desk is not just messy but is also jammed with a mandatory array of PCs, laptops, screens, tablets, and more. French designer Amir Labidi has developed a laptop concept dubbed the “LapTouch” for the creative community, with the specific aim of consolidating design functions and reducing desktop congestion.

As a daily user of a graphics tablet and computer, Labidi says the concept was derived from the difficulty he found positioning a tablet and PC together to be able to press keys while using the pen. These issues, coupled with carrying a separate laptop and graphics tablet on the move, formed the notion of designing a laptop with a built-in graphics tablet.

Though hybrid touchpad laptop models are already available, Labidi’s concept for the LapTouch is aimed at a specific market. The large touchpad also serves as a graphics tablet that features specific touch-sensitive scroll and zoom buttons, to save moving to the keyboard to activate commands. In addition, the touch pad is designed as a removable shell that can be turned to the preferred side.

The large touchpad would also serve as a graphics tablet that features specific touch-sens...

Labidi hopes that if the new Panasonic tablet or Wacom Cintiq prove to be beyond your price range, then his idea may meet tactile drawing requirements in a cost-effective manner should the concept be realized.

With its good looks and bundled features, the LapTouch concept has been shared on social networks and is currently undergoing a patent application. There is still much to resolve, and the concept’s multiple components alongside the significant processing power to run the design software may prove costly to manufacture.

For the time being at least, the creative world will have to stick to a cluttered desk and its suggestion of a brilliant mind.

Source: Amir Labidi via Iam Architect

About the Author
Donna Taylor After years of working in software delivery, Donna seized the opportunity to head back to university and this time study a lifelong passion: Architecture. Originally from the U.K. and after living in many countries, Donna and her family are now settled in Western Australia. When not writing Donna can be found at the University of Western Australia's Architecture, Landscape and Visual Arts Department.   All articles by Donna Taylor
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4 Comments

Nice design. I could easily see myself using one of these if they ever were ever sold at a reasonable price.

Dave MacLachlan
29th April, 2013 @ 05:16 pm PDT

I would be the typical user for this thing, if it only would run something other than windows ... because hardware is only one part of the product, and at microsoft, they simply have not yet understood the implications of a touch interface, and probably won't within the next years.

martinkopplow
30th April, 2013 @ 02:29 am PDT

I like the way that 'shiny keyboard' is listed as a feature.

It's a nice innovation, but given the inevitable high cost I'll just stick with separate components.

pt88
30th April, 2013 @ 06:46 am PDT

But they already made tablet pcs? GRAPHIC tablet pcs? In the 2000s? That looked like the tablet pcs we have now, and you could draw directly on them, like a cintiq?????? They weren't THAT great but drawing on screen is so preferable to the tiniest-wacom-you-can-find alternative. :/ Not that I wouldn't still appreciate it.

Sorry, I'm just super frustrated all the time that they don't really still make those and I didn't get one when I had the chance.

Raz Von Frankenstein
4th July, 2014 @ 01:45 am PDT
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