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Koenigsegg pushes the supercar envelope with 1-megawatt One:1

By

March 5, 2014

The One:1 breaks cover at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show (Photo: CC Weiss/Gizmag.com)

The One:1 breaks cover at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show (Photo: CC Weiss/Gizmag.com)

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Take note of these numbers: 1,341 hp to 1,360 kg. It's a ratio that gives the latest hypercar from Sweden's Koenigsegg the potential to be the fastest car on Earth, with a listed 273-mph (440 km/h) top speed. It also gives the car its name: One:1. That's one horse for every kilo, or close enough to round up without thinking twice. Starting with the already ultra powerful, lightweight Agera, Koenigsegg reached deep into its bag of tricks to strip more weight, add more downforce and create one of the world's most extreme machines.

The One:1 is a sort of 20th birthday celebration for Koenigsegg. Back in 1994, when Swedish sensation Ace of Base was taking the world by storm, a bright eyed 22-year-old named Christian von Koenigsegg decided to follow a dream that would eventually make him a Swedish sensation in his own right. He set out to start a car company and design an exotic sports car. It's a dream that many a child has had, but not many adults have pursued. Koenigsegg drew from his well of passion and "mind-bending will" to go beyond just seeing it through, growing and evolving the dream for the next two decades – from the original CC8S, to the once-world-fastest CCR, to the One:1, with a few others in between.

Evolution skips ahead a few steps in the One:1. Koenigsegg explains that this riveting piece of engineering not only boasts the 1 hp/1 kg ratio, it is also the world's first homologated production car with a full megawatt of power. That leads Koenigsegg to coin what very well may be the next evolution of sports car nomenclature. Beyond the "super" and "hyper" cars lies the megacar.

The extra power pushing the car into mega territory comes from a variety of modifications to the 5.0-liter twin-turbo V8, including a strengthened block, new head gaskets and variable geometry turbocharging. The upgraded engine cranks out more than 738 lb-ft (1,000 Nm) of torque between 3,000 and 7,500 rpm, with the max torque of 1,011 lb-ft (1,371 Nm) coming at 6,000 rpm.

As impressive as the power and torque figures are, they're really only the introduction to a much longer story. Each year, supercar manufacturers find ways of adding more and more horsepower to their grumbling, four-wheeled beasts, but Koenigsegg undertook a much more careful balancing act. In addition to adding more than 200 horses above and beyond the Agera R, Koenigsegg indulged a weight-savings obsession, carving, slicing, molding and shaving materials and weight in every way it could think of.

Christian von Koenigsegg discusses his latest creation (Photo: CC Weiss/Gizmag.com)

"We had to fight really, really hard to reach that goal [of a 1:1 ratio]," Christian von Koenigsegg explained at the Geneva Motor Show press conference. "It's about 80 kilos lighter than our normal [Agera]. We had to change the carbon fiber type to a newer, later grade, which is used in Formula 1 today, re-engineer all the layup schemes in the body and the monocoque. We have put more titanium. We have lightened everything we can find – thinner glass area, thinner, lighter seats with memory foam ... just really optimizing everything."

That weight saving arrives in spite of the fact that the One:1 gains 66 lb (30 kg) in new features like active aerodynamics and suspension systems.

The One:1 includes a large front splitter and winglets (Photo: CC Weiss/Gizmag.com)

The One:1 loses some of the smooth, rounded looks of the Agera R because it has a fully revamped aerodynamics package. The face of this package is the massive splitter and side winglets up front, which add downforce, an effort aided by the new hood outlets and active flaps below the splitter. According to Koenigsegg, the massive wing jutting off the rear slope of the cabin is the world's first top-mounted, active rear wing.

"The reason why it's top-mounted is because the underside of the wing is the most important for aerodynamics to create downforce," Christian von Koenigsegg explains. "It's the equivalent of the top side of an aeroplane wing."

The wing is electronically controlled and hydraulically activated, adjusting between high downforce and low drag based upon vehicle speed and G-force. The One:1 has 1,830 lb (830 kg) of downforce at its top speed of 273 mph (440 km/h) and 1,345 lb (610 kg) at 162 mph (260 km/h). The wing can also assist in extreme braking, helping the One:1 halt from 249 mph (400 km/h) in 10 seconds flat.

A peek at the mechanicals

Koenigsegg promises that, despite the fact the One:1 has a simulated top speed a few mph's higher than the latest world's fastest car – the Hennessey Venom GT – the One:1 is designed to be every bit as thrilling around the corners and S-curves of the track as on straight runways. In fact, it goes so far as to say that top speed wasn't a priority in its development ... but it is equipped with tires rated to 273 mph (440 km/h), just in case the driver feels the urge. The One:1 can spit out 2 Gs of cornering force and has an active suspension system to adapt to the driving conditions at hand.

Zero-to-62 mph times appear a little passé for a car of the One:1's caliber. Koenigsegg only lists the not-so-practical 0-249 mph (400 km/h) time of 20 seconds. With that type of quickness, the One:1 may just follow in the footsteps of the Agera R, setting acceleration records in place of top speed records.

The One:1 has a carbon-Kevlar body fixed atop its honeycomb-core carbon fiber monocoque. The combination is 20 percent lighter than the Agera thanks to the use of M46J and M55J carbon fibers. The model loses Koenigsegg's traditional hood-stowable roof for a fixed panel due to the aerodynamic modifications to the hood.

The memory foam on the new seats provides increased comfort (Photo: Koenigsegg)

Inside, the driver and passenger are secured to their lightweight racing seats with six-point harnesses. Koenigsegg loves talking about the memory-foam aspect of the seats, which dials in personalized fit and comfort. A 3G telemetry system connects with the owner's iPhone and also provides lap times and other performance features.

Koenigsegg only plans to build six examples of the One:1, and every one of them is already spoken for. It didn't share how much those buyers are spending on the purchase, but we're quite sure the price is comfortably into seven-figure territory.

Source: Koenigsegg

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
10 Comments

One of my favorite exotic car makers upping the ante. Koenigsegg always manage to use light weight materials and usually add a patent or two with each new rendition. Can't wait to see the top speed run, but one can be pretty sure VW will be bogarding the track. Lets just hope they can rent someone's runway to prove the top speed of this beast!

Michael Wilson
5th March, 2014 @ 05:48 pm PST

The line begins to blur between car and aircraft.

Is that wet weight, and are you accounting for the driver?

Please get rid of the mirrors they are horrid, and will vibrate, besides since you will be passing everything else why bother.

A small wide angle camera on each fender instead with OLED displays will suffice at (look at me speeds), oh and you will need one at the rear for reversing.

Forget the wiper at those speeds it's also useless, Rainx the glass instead. Besides you will not likely drive this in the rain, certainly not at high speed with those tires.

Lower the nose, pull out the reverse slant, creats too much lift and perhaps you could trim away those carbon winglets up front.

Bob Flint
5th March, 2014 @ 07:00 pm PST

You've got to smile when they release a 0-249mph time rather than a 0-60 or 0-100 ! When does the Stig get his hands on one?

JPAR
6th March, 2014 @ 04:29 am PST

It looks pretty, but there again, so does a chocolate condom. In their own way they are both about as practical as each other.

My ideal vehicle for getting around London in the rush hour is a people carrier or half-glazed similar sized van. Neither should be less than ten years old, and the higher the driving seat, the better, which gives excellent visibility - the opposite of this animal. Being old means that you don't have a lot to lose when it comes to who goes first when lanes converge. (No claims bonus? - in London? In traffic? In jest, right?) On the open road, speed limits and their enforcement make the sort of top speed this beast delivers purely academic.

Mel Tisdale
6th March, 2014 @ 04:45 am PST

Yawn. Another uber car for the uber rich. Obviously with enough money anything can be done. And so last century, as all these are. The only vehicle in my book that would qualify as "super" is the one that can get 100 mpg on renewable fuel (or be all electric and go 125 miles at sustained highway speeds on a single charge), carry at least 2 people and a reasonable amount of cargo, achieve 85 mph or better and cost well under $8000 -- all while meeting current U.S. safety requirements. A real mouthful, yes, and a real challenge which so far no one has met. But they're getting close. Keep on keepin' on.

Neil Larkins
6th March, 2014 @ 08:36 am PST

The proliferation of these hypercars is an indication of how the planet's wealth is held by the .0001%, captured from we who have created it.

They will never stop taking, even as the planet's ecosystem collapses all around us. Benjamin Franklin was right: he said Greed was the worst of the Seven Deadly Sins because "No amount will satisfy it."

We can have Capitalism and Oligarchy, or Democracy and survival. This choice is interesting; these cars are boring.

mookins
6th March, 2014 @ 08:46 am PST

Is this important because it is a "production" vehicle? There are a couple of cars in Southern California which are over the 1:1. In fact they are cars which would post numbers in excess of this vehicle being as one was designed as a truly bespoke "G" machine, wrapped in what looks like an early 60's muscle car shell. Though it is in fact an 8th scale carbon fiber body with a custom chassis which is optimized for handling.

As for this Koenigsegg thing, we can all look forward to someone bolting a go-pro on, and going around central London in order to capture all of the people looking at the owner of the amazing machine.

steveraxx
6th March, 2014 @ 10:37 am PST

curb weight is with 1/2 tank of fuel. As for the car itself, 2.0g grip on the skid pad and one of the best stability control systems around. There are some great youtube videos shot on their airfield where the driver stamps on the brakes from 300kp/h, hands off the wheel and the car tracks straight and stops true. Others have him yanking the wheel at the same speed rapidly left and right, and the vehicle fails to upset or spin off. Of all supercars, koenigsegg is probably my favorite as the aero is usually functional, the engines typically emit the lowest carbons and have the highest specific output her liter, and they tend to be unbeatable in a race.

Michael Wilson
6th March, 2014 @ 01:12 pm PST

Larkins & Mookins I'm not sure why you even bother to read this? Tesla is making great progress at pushing electric cars along. We still need to develop electric power more efficiently and cleaner. Nuclear is still the cleanest option and with some hurdles removed and new designs we could do wonders. Still, I like supercars because it is a dreamworld. I love technology as it improves most everything.

The idea that we should split the wealth more evenly is just not life. Those who take risks and put in effort must have an incentive to do just that. For those who prefer others take the risk and just want to be a worker in another's creation? Great but that will always reward you less. It seems pretty fair too me. I don't suggest that each case is the same.

I've got a good friend who took a different route than I did. I had a career in the military flying special operations helicopters. I loved it. I wouldn't change it. I was paid exactly what I expected to be paid.

My friend worked for various corporations before risking every penny he had to begin a business in 1995. Brothers, sisters, parents? All imagined he was foolish and crazy. What are you thinking? You are a dreamer! Why would you do this? A few years pass by and the family that scoffed at him now all work for him. He had zero help from anyone but himself. He hired people and paid wages. Their risk? Zero.

My point is why would anyone feel he didn't earn his right to have the things he has? He has created a small slice of our economy. He has created many jobs. He would hire more people if he didn't get socked with huge taxes every quarter. Now applying that across the board except for those who inherited their wealth (even then, their ancestors earned it) why should they not have greater returns possible for their effort?

Economic wealth is not a zero sum game. Wealth can grow as people invent new products and methods. We need to have incentive so that some people will take the risks and try to do grand things. I'm sure Koenigsegg employs a goodly number of people. I'm just glad he is still doing it. I will never own any of Christian's cars. I hope that in the next ten years they simply astonish me with their creations.

Bryan Haslett
6th March, 2014 @ 05:15 pm PST

My dear Mr. 'Mookins' the planet's ecosystem is not collapsing all around us!!

You're American right? Have you been to the Great Lakes? They're fine. The Mississippi flows quite well too and the miles and miles of arable land I just drive by in GA last week was perfectly healthy. The farm we stopped at was beautiful, like a Walton's set.

Please, take your silly leftist hand-wringing elsewhere. Go and picket a meat packing plant or shout at some Hollywood star for having 3 houses.

Neil
2nd April, 2014 @ 11:41 am PDT
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