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Kickr adds an electric motor to any longboard

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September 24, 2013

Kickr is designed to add an electric motor to any longboard

Kickr is designed to add an electric motor to any longboard

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Longboards are a great way to get around for many people, but kicking on the flats can be rather tiring. That's where motorized options like the LaGrange L1 truck come into play. Now, a new option called Kickr offers an electric motor without requiring the user to change trucks.

To use Kickr, the skater connects the device to their existing board. To do so, they wrap the battery pack around the bottom of the board, remove one of the wheel bolts and attach the motor above said wheel. Once everything's reattached, the user steps on the throttle button (which is on the strap for the battery) and the motor turns the wheel and moves the board.

The design allows the motor to work with almost any longboard, which means users can keep using the board with which they are comfortable, instead of having to adapt to a new one.

Kickr promises speeds up to 20 mph (32 km/h) and enough battery power to travel about six miles (9.6 km). A full charge of the battery should take about two hours. The device weighs less than five pounds (2.3 kg), so it shouldn't add too much weight to the board.

A view of the parts of the Kickr longboard motor

The execution of the prototype is a little rough to look at, but it's easy to see where the design makes sense. The final design looks a lot cleaner, but the creators haven't shown off that look in a final working prototype.

The team at Kickr is seeking funding for its motor on Kickstarter. Buyers interested in getting a kit for their longboard can do so for a minimum pledge of US$399, assuming the funding goal is met.

The pitch video below shows the motor in action.

Sources: Kickr, Kickstarter

About the Author
Dave LeClair Dave is an avid follower of all things mobile, gaming, and any kind of new technology he can get his hands on. Ever since he first played an NES as a child, he's been an absolute tech and gaming junkie.   All articles by Dave LeClair
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6 Comments

No brakes, throttle by pedal, unreal high price.

iperov
24th September, 2013 @ 01:32 pm PDT

@iperov

No brakes?

- wrong.

Throttle by pedal?

- wrong.

Unreal high-price?

- I suppose that's an opinion. But considering its one of the least expensive electric-skateboard options I've ever seen (and I've seen a LOT), I wouldn't agree.

Milton
24th September, 2013 @ 04:45 pm PDT

If a wheel can be swapped with one that has a gear so that a more efficient transfer of energy can be effected, the concept will be more appealing. With the design they have now, how long will it last before slippage occurs frequently?

thk
24th September, 2013 @ 05:08 pm PDT

The point is to not have to modify your board much.

It will fit in an elevator and can be carried onto a bus/train.

Heaps cheaper than those daggy electric bikes.

The drive is spring loaded, direct drive might be suicide if a component fails.

Ozuzi
24th September, 2013 @ 07:22 pm PDT

@iperov

My mistake.

I stand corrected:

There are no brakes!

(In another build-topic I remember them claiming braking-abilities... guess they canned that idea).

Milton
25th September, 2013 @ 08:57 am PDT

Looks like it'd quickly grind the wheel down to a nubbin.

Gregg Eshelman
25th September, 2013 @ 11:41 pm PDT
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