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Jaguar Virtual Windscreen concept looks to the future of HUDs

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July 13, 2014

The 'Virtual Windscreen' is also able to display a racing line for trackday warriors

The 'Virtual Windscreen' is also able to display a racing line for trackday warriors

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Looking to add a touch of Gran Turismo or Forza to your daily commute? Jaguar Land Rover is developing a Virtual Windscreen concept that aims to do just that with a slew of driver assistance technologies designed to keep your eyes on the road, including a head-up display (HUD) that overlays the driving line featured in many virtual racers.

As well as projecting key information onto the windscreen like speed and navigation, the Jaguar Virtual Windscreen concept would also overlay the driving line and even a "ghost" car, which acts as a reference point from previous laps.

Although this may seem like a bit of fun for track-day warriors, HUD systems offer some obvious safety benefits for having key information at the driver's eye-level.

Jaguar's concept also extends to replacing rear view and external mirrors with cameras and virtual displays. This system would incorporate a of a "3D instrument cluster" linked to head-tracking technology that could deliver key information unobtrusively as well as giving drivers a clear picture of their surroundings.

Finally, the system would include gesture-based control for functions like sunblinds, rear windscreen wipers and maps. Rather than having to search for buttons on the dash, the idea is that drivers could simply wave at the gesture-sensor with a range of 15 cm (5.9 in) to operate particular functions. Of the three tech concepts in development, this is the one most likely to appear in production models in the near term, with Jaguar claiming it could be on sale "within the next few years."

Below is Jaguar's video detailing how the Virtual Windscreen concept would work.

Source: Jaguar

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3 Comments

How long before some clown, thinking they can impress their mates/partners with their driving prowess, decides to select 'racing line' information for normal road use and ploughs head on into oncoming traffic at the apex of a bend in the road?

I once had the unpleasant experience of arriving on the scene of such a collision between a sports car and a lorry (no guesses for which one was on the racing line). I subsequently discovered that the sports car involved had only recently been lovingly restored by the driver. He undid all his hard work in a matter of milliseconds, killing himself and his girlfriend as he did so. The lorry driver was 'only' shaken by the experience. Had it been a fully occupied family saloon, or people carrier, the death toll would have been much higher.

The worrying aspect of this item is that it yet again displays the fact that the car industry is out of touch with reality. To paraphrase a famous president: "It's economy, stupid!"

Mel Tisdale
14th July, 2014 @ 03:04 am PDT

I AGREE!

This 'track' mode should never have been installed.

Inexperienced, reckless, stupid, drunken bravado (pick one) drivers cause enough carnage already.

Driver assistance maybe a good thing, but has to be tempered with commonsense, not "Hey! we can do this as well" designer thinking.

The Skud
14th July, 2014 @ 06:16 pm PDT

The technology of a heads up display picked up by Chevy for it Corvette should think about advancing it's heads up display, but with useful tool, not video games. Also Jaguar should think about the craziness in their designers and not take them too seriously. The ideas in this video will cause accidents. too many stupid people on the road now, not even trying to drive, but just waiting for the autonomous car to take them everywhere (another mistake). The Road is for people who want to drive and have taken the time to learn how. If you have you head stuck in the cloud, stay home, if you want to be drive, take the bus or taxi.

Gargamoth
31st July, 2014 @ 08:08 am PDT
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