Decision time? Check out our latest product comparisons

Hobbyist builds working replica of Iron Man's laser gauntlet

By

January 21, 2013

Patrick Priebe has created a functioning laser gauntlet, modeled after the one worn by sup...

Patrick Priebe has created a functioning laser gauntlet, modeled after the one worn by superhero Iron Man

Image Gallery (4 images)

Given that most real-life superheroes don’t have the budget of Tony Stark or Bruce Wayne, you would assume that their gadgetry wouldn’t be quite on par with what we’re used to seeing in the movies. German cyber weapons hobbyist Patrick Priebe recently dropped us a line, however, to tell us about his latest homebuilt creation – a working laser gauntlet, just like the one made famous by a certain Iron Man.

The aluminum-bodied device opens up for the user to insert their forearm, then gently clamps onto it using a spring/lever system. An LED display on the side of the gauntlet lights up once it’s locked in place, letting the user know that it’s ready to go ... and also to look cool, of course.

When the would-be Iron Man wants to zap something, they do so via button controls on the palm-mounted control module. This initially activates a servo, which causes the laser rig to rise out of the top of the gauntlet. Two red lasers on that rig are then used for aiming at the target, after which a thicker blue laser (mounted between them) is selected to deliver the coup de grâce. It may not be a strong enough beam to disable a car or anything, but as you can see in the demo video at the bottom of the page, you wouldn’t want to be a balloon around this thing.

The laser gauntlet's two red aiming lasers
The laser gauntlet's two red aiming lasers

Although Iron Man’s movie gauntlet utilized a red "destructive" beam, Priebe told us that he went with a blue laser because it’s more powerful and more visible. Additionally, a second blue laser is located in his gauntlet’s palm control unit. All four lasers are powered by one 3.7-volt lithium-ion battery, with two smaller batteries powering the LEDs and the servo.

According to Patrick, it took him 120 hours to build the gauntlet – and he wasn’t working from plans of any kind. As with his past creations (such as a coilgun, flame-throwing glove, and rotary blade-shooting crossbow), he’s not about to tell people how to build one of their own. If you contact him via his website, however, he might be willing to make you one ... for the right price.

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
Tags
6 Comments

"It may not be a strong enough beam to disable a car or anything, but as you can see in the demo video at the bottom of the page, you wouldn’t want to be a balloon around this thing."

Or an eyeball. Those would blind someone instantly!

Joel Detrow
21st January, 2013 @ 02:14 pm PST

That will work, stand next to a free way and point it into on coming traffic. Beautiful there will be a pile up with cars and trucks they will be running off the road running into on coming traffic going the other way!!! Who said the only one/thing scared would be the balloon. I bet you could do thousands or tens of thousands worth of carnage!!! Think BIG people!!

Richard Handel
21st January, 2013 @ 06:05 pm PST

always amazed by this stuff!

billybob1851
22nd January, 2013 @ 08:25 am PST

Why not 3D print it?

Anyone have the time to model it and throw it onto Thingiverse? It'd be awesome for Halloween parties. Don't forget the cupholder for the beer...

solutions4circuits
22nd January, 2013 @ 08:48 am PST

This will be made unnecessary once we wrap the entire world in Nerf.

KMH
22nd January, 2013 @ 09:55 am PST

I can't help but notice:

"If you contact him via his website, however, he might be willing to make you one ... for the right price."

So... not only is he not adverse to commercial gain....

"....he’s not about to tell people how to build one of their own. "

... he's willing to try to create a form of scarcity by not disclosing how he does it, which, coupled with the above, pretty much solidifies the notion that he's intent on commercial gain.

So.... while what he's done is certainly cool, how is this guy not facing any sort of lawsuit for showing clear intent to make and distribute unlicensed merchandise using trademarks that are owned by another company?

Mark Tarrabain
22nd January, 2013 @ 09:01 pm PST
Post a Comment

Login with your gizmag account:

Or Login with Facebook:


Related Articles
Looking for something? Search our 29,036 articles