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Invis-A-Rack is a pop-up ladder rack for pick-ups

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January 31, 2012

The Invis-A-Rack is a ladder rack for pick-up trucks that folds away when not in use

The Invis-A-Rack is a ladder rack for pick-up trucks that folds away when not in use

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If you need to transport things like building materials, boats or construction equipment, then having a ladder rack over the bed of your pick-up truck can prove invaluable. Such racks also add to your vehicle's aerodynamic drag, however, plus they can get in the way when loading certain cargo items, and they make your truck look like ... well, like a work truck. That's why Donny McCall invented the Invis-A-Rack. It's an aluminum ladder rack that can reportedly support up to 500 pounds (227 kg) when in use, but that folds away in seconds when not needed.

The Invis-A-Rack installs on a truck's existing bed rails using an integrated clamping system and theft resistant bolts. According to the manufacturer, one person can manage the task in about ten minutes, without having to do any drilling. It consists of four main housings, which the rack components quickly fold up and out of when it's load-carryin' time. The system also includes utility boxes, for storing bungee cords and cinching straps.

The Invis-A-Rack folds away when not in use
The Invis-A-Rack folds away when not in use

The rack is compatible with a fairly wide range of American and Japanese trucks, which are listed on the company website. The Invis-A-Rack is available in six- and eight-foot (1.8 and 2.4 meter) long models, both of which are priced at US$699.95. Accessories including bike holders, canoe and kayak mounts, and front and rear extension arms are in the works.

To see how the system works, see the video below.

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
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10 Comments

Looks like the Shark Tank didn't keep him down.

Ryan Gribble
31st January, 2012 @ 03:13 pm PST

Nice but I could build something out of scape lumber that would be just as effective and not cost near as much.

Slowburn
31st January, 2012 @ 08:11 pm PST

That price is comparable to what it costs to put a rack system on my truck from Thule.

mharrison
1st February, 2012 @ 05:09 am PST

@ Slowburn - My step-dad is a carpenter. He followed your concept. Build one out of lumber. Compared to this it's a huge clunky inconvenient pain in the rear. broken down it takes up significant space in the cargo bed, it's heavy and takes about fifteen minutes to set up again. If invis-a-rack isn't hugely expensive I'd pay it rather than have one of the ugly bulky cumbersome homemade ones on my truck.

VirtualGathis
1st February, 2012 @ 05:17 am PST

re; VirtualGathis

Your step-dad is a carpenter, but obviously not an architect or engineer.

Slowburn
1st February, 2012 @ 07:52 am PST

I want one ... I saw him on the Shark Tank and thought it was a good idea then ... after all the BS that came from the mouth of the Shark Tank's panel, I'm glad to see, he's up and at it ...and won't go offshore ...

Gary P. Joyce
1st February, 2012 @ 08:39 am PST

Racks definitely effect your fuel mileage,too.

You'd surprised what just an open(expanded)metal ramp-gate on a trailer can do.

My friend called me the other day and was amazed with the mileage drop he was experiencing bringing a little flatbed back across the country.

I told him to take the ramp-gate off and lay it down.

He did and his mileage went back up to right at normal.

On the highway,

I have run trucks both ways and aerodynamic drag is far worse than weight(of course!).

I'm sure that this pays for itself pretty quick if you do much highway driving,

especially compared to the over-the-cab models.

With fuel costs going up,

every MPG counts.

Griffin
1st February, 2012 @ 08:51 am PST

I saw this on SharkTank as well, I thought it was brilliant..I want one...count me in, oh I also work for the studio's I know they'll want one too...I like this guy's passion, it is america..pure and simple...

Allen S Miller
1st February, 2012 @ 10:49 am PST

I also saw this on Shark Tank. I could not believe they passed on this because he wasn't interested in manufacturing it off shore. The guy is a CHAMP! The sharks are chumps.

Sure, it would be cheaper to manufacture off shore, but I suspect there is plenty of profit with it made right here at home. Too bad more don't think like this guy. My only worry is that now that it has been exposed on TV, the Chinese or other cut throat group copies it and puts him out of business. Patents only count if you can defend them ($$$$).

Burnerjack
1st February, 2012 @ 12:35 pm PST

All those who believe that driving a truck with the tailgate down will increase the gas mileage should check out the MythBusters episode which disproves this. Just Google r3hab-O9E to find it. Oddly, a mesh tailgate WILL increase mileage by 5%. But tailgate down, removed, or using a tonneau cover - no good.

SeekMocha
6th February, 2012 @ 11:20 am PST
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