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K-abeilles Hotel is a shelter for bees – and humans

By

February 7, 2013

French Architecture Studio AtelierD has designed a pavilion for both bees and humans (Phot...

French Architecture Studio AtelierD has designed a pavilion for both bees and humans (Photo: Stephane Spach)

Image Gallery (7 images)

Bees are having a tough time at the moment, and it’s largely down to their relationship with us humans. Not only are they combating pollutants affecting the quality and color of their honey, but studies are also linking pesticide use to what is known as Colony Collapse Disorder. French architecture studio AtelierD has designed a pavilion for both bees and humans alike, that whimsically hopes to redress the delicate balance between the two species.

AtelierD’s 20 sq. mt. (215 sq. ft.) multi-use pavilion has been designed specifically with wild bees – as opposed to honey bees – in mind. Dubbed the K-abeilles Hotel, it is built from wood and features a wall of hexagonal compartments filled with material such as bricks, twigs, reeds, bark and hay to create refuge spaces for wild bees to inhabit. These micro-housings provide the honeycomb look and feel that is repeated through to the human side of the shelter.

Called the K-abeilles Hotel, the pavilion also provides a shady space for humans (Photo: S...

The interior space is the human component of the "bee hotel," in which humans can sit on hexagonal benches while watching the bees at work – it is hoped that the K-abeilles Hotel will ultimately encourage a greater cohesion between man and nature.

The design was exhibited at the Muttersholtz Archi Festival last September, which showcases sustainable development and eco-tourism.

Source: AtelierD via Architzer

About the Author
Donna Taylor After years of working in software delivery, Donna seized the opportunity to head back to university and this time study a lifelong passion: Architecture. Originally from the U.K. and after living in many countries, Donna and her family are now settled in Western Australia. When not writing Donna can be found at the University of Western Australia's Architecture, Landscape and Visual Arts Department.   All articles by Donna Taylor
8 Comments

It looks really neat but I would put some kind of barrier to keep people from interferring with or getting stung by the bees.

BigGoofyGuy
7th February, 2013 @ 12:02 pm PST

Agreed! Beat me to it BigWarpGuy!

yrag
7th February, 2013 @ 06:40 pm PST

What a great idea - bees and hotel guests sharing the same space.

What could POSSIBLY go wrong?

Booleanboy
8th February, 2013 @ 02:02 am PST

Did I miss the bees in the photographs, or are we supposed to sit in this thing and "Grok" the bees by virtue of being inside a honeycomb looking thing?

John Hagen-Brenner
8th February, 2013 @ 08:53 am PST

Tip:

DON'T wear perfume or cologne!

DON'T wear dark clothing!

DON'T fear!

Equals NO PROBLEM with bees.

...simple

Lawrence Mark
8th February, 2013 @ 03:18 pm PST

Wild bee's do not defend their nests. So as long as you do not squeeze them it is highly unlikely that they sting you. Additionally most wild bees live solitary.

Personally I know multiple wild bee hotels and never got a problem when visiting them. One of them is on my balcony!

Jarunik
11th February, 2013 @ 01:11 am PST

The designer's in France, where there are no Africanized hybrids.

SEE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africanized_bee

This design would simply no longer be safe in some of the south and southwestern United States, nor most or any of central or south America.

Nice, otherwise, though.

Gregg DesElms
13th February, 2013 @ 05:53 pm PST

Building a hotel for bees is very thoughtful.

Aurora
2nd December, 2013 @ 04:09 am PST
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