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Hisense 60" TV concept delivers glasses-free 3D from almost any angle

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January 9, 2013

The new 60-inch TV uses an Ultra High Definition (UHD) panel to provide a clear, 3D pictur...

The new 60-inch TV uses an Ultra High Definition (UHD) panel to provide a clear, 3D picture from almost any angle, so multiple viewers can enjoy the 3D effect without needing multiple pairs of glasses

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In addition to a 110" Ultra-HD LED TV, Hisense also revealed its latest take on glasses-free 3D technology at CES with the GF60XT980 television concept. The new 60-inch TV uses an Ultra High Definition (UHD) panel to provide a clear, 3D picture from almost any angle, so multiple viewers can enjoy the 3D effect without needing multiple pairs of glasses.

The UHD panel displays a 2160p resolution image by using a video engine that projects the content through a high-precision lenticular lens. A facial tracking system built into the TV also adjusts the image subtly to ensure a user gets the best view possible. This is what lets viewers enjoy the 3D image even when not directly in front of the screen.

As a bonus, the TV can also convert almost any 2D video into 3D, though the quality of this feature remains to be seen.

This was actually one of the crisper glasses-free 3D displays we saw at the Las Vegas Convention Center on the opening day of CES 2013. Unlike many no-glasses 3D TVs on hand, the 3D effect remained surprisingly sharp even when viewed from different angles and had a remarkably clear picture – better in fact than some 3D TVs on the market that require glasses. One negative point is that the depth of the 3D appears much shallower than on the 3D TVs currently available, so don't expect to see any images popping out of the screen.

Unfortunately, the GF60XT980 is only a concept model and won't be appearing on store shelves anytime soon, but it's still a positive step towards a glasses-free 3D television that's fit for consumers.

About the Author
Jonathan Fincher Jonathan grew up in Norway, China, and Trinidad before graduating film school and becoming an online writer covering green technology, history and design, as well as contributing to video game news sites like Filefront and 1Up. He currently resides in Texas, where his passions include video games, comics, and boring people who don't want to talk about either of those things.   All articles by Jonathan Fincher
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3 Comments

That's exciting.

thk
9th January, 2013 @ 03:21 am PST

Please do not say something can "convert" 2D material into 3D . How could you convert the famous b&w film Casablanca into 3D? Clearly this would be physically impossible since only one viewpoint was recorded at the time of shooting the film.

An illusion of some depth might be possible perhaps if foreground and background objects could be identified and then the images of the background objects softened to reduce their visual impact, but there could never be any true depth to the image as this requires two cameras spaced apart receiving images from different angles - like human eyes.

professore
10th January, 2013 @ 05:44 am PST

Sorry, I didn't read the part about creating a hologram of an old movie. It will however offer the deception of depth to a 2 dementional presentation. What's called 3-D in television and movies.

Jeff Vandervort
10th January, 2013 @ 01:44 pm PST
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