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Health and Wellbeing


— Health and Wellbeing

Bluetooth health monitoring lets you upload your vital stats to your doctor from home

May 9, 2007 Turning the health-care model upside down, a small Australian company is working on bluetooth technology that logs and transmits medical observation data to a central network through a mobile phone - so your doctor can call YOU when a problem is developing. Alive's bluetooth technology is already proving useful in the recovery of cardiac outpatients and the diagnosis of sleep apnea - and a range of products in development aim to make advancements in health monitoring for diabetics, mountaineers and athletes in training. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Cooling glove invigorates overheated athletes - and also delivers training performance gains

May 9, 2007 While traditional body cooling systems such as ice vests, wet towels and misting fans may feel like they're working to the benefit of the user, they're actually quite ineffective at reducing the body's core temperature, as they work against the body's natural insulation and heat retention systems. Through extensive research into mammalian heat regulation systems, AVAcore has developed a simple, portable device that effects heat exchange to the body core extremely quickly. You don't necessarily feel cooler, you just feel completely refreshed and less fatigued - and the system is producing some remarkable and unexpected results for athletes. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

3-D ultrasound from 2-D scanners for less than US$1000

May 7, 2007 Almost every doctor’s surgery in a developed country has a 2-D ultrasound scanner and for most parents it’s the first time they see their child-to-be. Apart from enabling us to see an unborn child in its mother’s womb, medical ultrasonography helps to detect gall stones, identify tumor-like lumps and it plays a particularly important role in the early detection of breast cancer. Three-dimensional sonography can provide especially informative images, for instance allowing the structure of tumors, their growth pattern and their blood supply to be clearly distinguished from healthy tissue. Although 3-D technology has been available since the 1990s, it remains prohibitively expensive. Physicians and clinics wishing to upgrade from 2-D to 3-D technology usually have to invest more than US$100,000 in new equipment. Now researchers have produced a system that enables conventional 2-D ultrasound scanners to be upgraded to provide 3-D images for less than US$1000. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

New table saw can tell the difference between wood and hands

May 7, 2007 Table saws are involved in more than 60,000 accidents every year in the United States alone - an accident every nine minutes, costing US$2 billion before you consider the pain and disruption. Now a small Oregon company is changing woodworking professionals’ jobs with a table saw that only cuts wood – not fingers. The company has invented a table saw that immediately retracts the blade when it touches a finger, making woodworking safer and eliminating painful and very costly medical procedures. When the blade touches a finger (or something else that conducts electrical current), the current drops and engages a brake. As the blade’s teeth sink into the brake, the momentum forces the blade to drop below the table. The entire process takes only three milliseconds, which is a fraction of the time it takes to blink your eye. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor

April 16, 2007 Taking one’s blood pressure can clearly tell you a lot about your health, but not nearly as much as SunTech Medical’s Oscar 2 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor (ABP) monitor. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides a comprehensive assessment of a patient’s blood pressure profile with BP variability, overnight dipping and morning surge that in-clinic and home BP monitoring cannot provide. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Behaviour scientists shake Darwin’s foundation - chickens inherited parents' stress symptoms

April 12, 2007 Evolutionary theory ever since Darwin is based on the assumption that acquired traits, such as learnt modifications of behaviour, cannot be inherited by the offspring. Now, a Swedish-Norwegian research group, led by professor Per Jensen at Linköping university in Sweden, shows that chickens can actually inherit behavioural modifications induced by stress in their parents. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Sportkat’s Korebalance balances mind and body

April 12, 2007 Korebalance, the latest exercise machine from Sportkat, is different from other fitness equipment – it exercises the brain as well as the body. Korebalance includes a 17 inch touch screen monitor, supported by the Linux operating system, that runs 3D software games as you exercise. Lee Samango, Chief Executive Officer of Sportkat, says “This product forces users to employ their vision, the body and brain. Your brain acts like the rest of your muscles—it can get stronger, make new ways (or find different ways) of doing the same task...Korebalance radically improves muscle and mental agility to increase athletic performance.” Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Precise and low-cost submicron fabrication technique for manufacturing human spare parts

April 12, 2007 VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tampere University of Technology and Nanofoot Finland Oy have developed a direct-write three-dimensional forming method of biomaterials. The methodology enables fabrication of nano and micrometer scale structures that can be used as parts of tissue engineering scaffolds. The project is funded by the BioneXt Tampere Research Programme. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing Feature

The emergence of the Convenient Care Clinic

April 4, 2007 An interesting development in the health system in the U.S. of recent times has been a new type of health facility that is beginning to pop-up at local drug stores, discount stores and various supermarkets. In the store's local pharmacy, many establishments have set up mini-clinics. Operating specifically in high-traffic retail outlets with accessible pharmacy services, these clinics provide routine, non-emergency services to walk-in patients at affordable prices seven days a week. These mini-clinics cost half of what patients typically pay for a regular doctor's visit and are roughly one-sixth the cost of an emergency room visit. Patients who visit these mini-clinics are treated by a family nurse practitioner or a physician's assistant – both of whom can write prescriptions and perform a full exam. Although mini-clinics do not handle chronic illnesses, they are ideal for ailments like strep throat, sinus infections or common colds and with no appointment necessary, extended hours, and seven days a week, the approach is more in keeping with modern business practices than the unyielding, inefficient and expensive traditional health system. As Charles Darwin said: “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” Read More
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