Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Health and Wellbeing

The cat and mouse Pac-Man-style game found to help treat lazy eye

With video games having previously been found to improve decision making speeds and the brain's capacity to learn, scientists have now created challenging computer games with a fun element that significantly improved depth perception and binocular vision in people with a lazy eye. Unlike the traditional patch used to treat the condition, the video games encourage both eyes to work together.  Read More

An Ebola vaccine delivered through the nose and into the airways could help reduce the spr...

Scientists have produced a single dose Ebola vaccine shown to provide primates with long-term protection from the deadly disease. What is most promising about the development is the delivery method, with the vaccine administered through the nose and lungs, mitigating the associated risk of spreading the disease through infected needles.  Read More

Youbionic says its hands will cost around €1,000, a fraction of the price of current comme...

Italian start-up Youbionic has created a functional, myoelectric bionic hand using 3D printing and Arduino components. While still at prototype stage, the company says that its research will result in a prosthetic hand that costs a tenth or less than other models on the market.  Read More

Sesame aims to provide smartphone access to users with disabilities that prevent them from...

Sesame is a system designed specifically for users with only limited or no use of their hands. The device pairs head tracking software with some familiar hardware with the goal of bringing smartphone functionality to those who would otherwise be unable to make use of it.  Read More

A flower petal treated with WetForce-enabled sunscreen, before and after exposure to water...

Most people generally think of water and sweat as being things that hinder the effectiveness of sunscreen – even in cases where it's billed as being waterproof. According to Shiseido, however, its newly-developed WetForce technology not only keeps water from compromising sunscreen, but actually uses it to help block UV rays.  Read More

The prototype implant, with its near-infrared LED

Wouldn't it be great if there were implants that detected the brainwaves associated with conditions such as chronic headaches or epilepsy, and then responded by triggering genes in the patient's body to produce a protein that treated the condition? Well, scientists at the ETH Zurich research institute are on their way to making it happen. They've developed an implant that causes genetically-modified cells to express a specific protein, and the device is indeed activated by brain waves.  Read More

BitBite is worn discreetly behind the ear and keeps tabs on your chewing habits

Even with the growing number of calorie-counting gadgets on the market, keeping track of how healthily we are eating requires a certain amount of discipline. We are seeing devices emerge that are aimed at automating this even further, such as the Bite Counter and the Automatic Ingestion Monitor. The BitBite is the latest take on the eating monitor, relying an a discreet ear-clip to keep tabs on every little nibble.  Read More

Elvie is a newly announced pelvic floor muscle exercise tracking device and smartphone app

Further proof that there's almost always "an app for that," Elvie is a personal fitness aid that works with an accompanying app to provide women with real-time guidance and tracking of pelvic floor exercises.  Read More

By using Wink to take their basal body temperature, women can access data through Kindara'...

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there are 6.7 million women in the US with an impaired ability to become pregnant and carry a baby to term. US-based reproductive health company Kindara has now developed Wink, an oral thermometer that works in conjunction with a mobile app to inform women when the time is right – or wrong – to get down to business.  Read More

If this snake bit you, would you know that it was a great lakes bush viper? (Photo: Shutte...

When a snake-bite victim shows up at a hospital, it's vitally important for caregivers to know what species of snake bit them. Without that knowledge, they won't know what sort of anti-venom – if any – is required. Making that ID could one day be much easier, thanks to a current study in which species were reliably identified via snake DNA obtained from fang marks in victims' bite wounds.  Read More

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