Highlights from the 2015 Geneva Motor Show

Health and Wellbeing

A newly-discovered hormone has been found to mimic some of the benefits of exercise – alth...

All manner of weird and wonderful exercise contraptions pushed on late night infomercials are testament to people's desire for faster and easier ways to get the benefits of exercise – whether said contraptions are effective or not. But now researchers have discovered a hormone that could provide some of the benefits of exercise, without working up a sweat doing stomach crunches or bicep curls.  Read More

MTU researchers are hopeful that the all-seeing prosthetic foot will be pounding the pavem...

Computer-controlled artificial legs have aided in improving amputees' freedom of movement by mimicking the natural motion of their missing limbs. Now, a new robotic ankle promises to make this motion even more precise by using a camera to scan the ground ahead and dynamically adjusting to the terrain underfoot.  Read More

REMPARK includes a waist worn module that keeps track of a user's motor condition (Photo: ...

A European group headed by Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain, is in the process of trialling a cutting edge system with the potential to greatly improve the quality of life for those suffering from Parkinson's disease. The system, known as REMPARK, utilizes a small waist-worn module and headset controlled by a smartphone that will allow doctors to observe and manage the symptoms of Parkinson's in real time.  Read More

PhD student Alec Falkenham, inventor of the cream, studies a book of tattoos (Photo: Bruce...

As more people get tattooed, more of those people regret having done so. The tattoo removal business is huge, generating around $75 million in the US alone. Laser ablation is the most common removal method, but now a 27-year-old PhD student in Canada has come up with a cream that promises a gentler, safer method to get rid of undesired tattoos.  Read More

The arm band can be worn against the skin or over clothing (Image: University of Tokyo)

New help may be on the way for healthcare personnel tasked with monitoring multiple patients. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have created a solar-powered arm band, that sounds an alarm if the wearer's body temperature gets too high.  Read More

A new computer program uses video selfies to monitor mental health (Photo: Shutterstock)

Images of ourselves recorded through cameras on smartphones and laptops can be a welcome addition to communication with friends or professional interactions, or just a bit of fun. But this powerful combination of hardware and software is being tapped into by scientists for other purposes as well. A team of researchers at the University of Rochester has developed a computer program that can help health professionals monitor a person`s mental health through the images from selfie videos the patient records while engaging in social media activity.  Read More

The Vapor Shark DNA is one of the new breed of devices with temperature control functional...

There are a growing number of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) with temperature control functionality, allowing a fool-proof way to avoid either the overheating of Propylene Glycol (PG) and Glycerine (VG), the common carrier liquids for nicotine and flavoring, or a "dry puff", where the wick becomes too dry to produce vapor, and simply burns instead.  Read More

Bacterial biofilm formation on the right side of medical tubing is visible after being sta...

Whenever foreign objects such as catheters, implants or other devices are placed within the human body, there's a danger that bacterial colonies known as biofilms could collect on them, leading to infections. Now, however, scientists at Harvard University's Wyss Institute have created a material that's too slippery for those biofilms to cling onto. It works by continuously releasing oil.  Read More

A new study indicates e-cigarettes may not be the 'healthy' option many believe them to be...

Many people assume e-cigarettes are a healthier – or less unhealthy, at least – option than regular cigarettes, resulting in a rapid uptake in recent years. While the long-term effects of e-cigarettes are still unknown, research out of Johns Hopkins University has found that e-cigs may deliver a false sense of security along with their nicotine hit.  Read More

 Researchers have found one of the underlying processes of skin-based immunity (Photo: Shu...

The skin is the body's first line of defense against infection, with an extensive network of skin-based immune cells responsible for detecting the presence of foreign invaders. However, in addition to pathogens, an immune response can be triggered by allergens or even our own cells, resulting in unwanted inflammation and allergies. Researchers have now shed new light on the way the immune system in our skin works, paving the way for future improvements in tackling infections, allergies and autoimmune diseases.  Read More

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