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MotorBoard 2000XR: next generation electric scooter

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October 20, 2007

MotorBoard 2000XR: next generation electric scooter

MotorBoard 2000XR: next generation electric scooter

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October 21, 2007 Continuing its quest to take motorized scooters out of the realm of toys and into the arena of genuine, eco-friendly, urban transportation for adults, Roth Motor Company has released the much anticipated upgrade to their fully portable 2000X MotorBoard. The new 2000XR motorized scooter retains a safety-limited speed of 15mph but boasts improved torque, range and hill climbing capabilities over its predecessor.

The main improvements come courtesy of new battery technology - while the 2000X has a standard NiMH battery, the 2000XR gets its grunt from a safer, lighter and more powerful next generation lithium-ion battery developed by A123 Systems that utilizes highly active nanoscale material initially developed at MIT. Since the range began in 2002 with the release of the 1500X, the power has been doubled while the weight has been reduced with the latest model now capable of carrying an average sized rider (up to 250 lbs.) between 4-7 miles on a single charge with an extended range model also available that can travel up to 20 miles.

The batteries are low maintenance and can be fully charged in 90 minutes with the included Intelligent Quick Charger. They also have the added benefit of being 4 pounds lighter than their NiMH cousins in the 2000X, and for riders who forget to check the battery meter, or who think they should at least get some exercise, the 2000XR can be kick-scooted thanks to Roth’s patent-pending free-wheeling technology. The 2000XR also has an Ensolite rubber padding system under the wood deck, which Roth is designed for a smoother and more comfortable ride. At 16.5lbs, the portable and foldable unit is light enough to be carried on the subway, train, bus, or into work where it can be unobtrusively stored away.

Subscribing to the principle that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, the 2000XR retains many of the features of the the 2000X including twin custom motors and specially tuned front suspension springs that provide a smooth ride without resorting inflatable tyres which hinder performance. The 6061 aluminum alloy and signature orange wheels made of high rolling efficiency poly ether based polyurethane are also retained along with the computer controlled electronic microprocessor that makes possible the variable throttle to give smooth acceleration up to cruising speeds.

The power saving Kick-to-Go feature that is designed to increase efficiency and battery life with the low deck height of the unit encouraging the rider to kick to accelerate and help with low speed handling.

Recently shown at Santa Monica’s Alternative Car and Transportation (AltCar Expo), the 2000XR retails for US$799.

“I wanted to build a truly portable device that could be easily carried and yet was still powerful enough to pull an adult up a modest grade. Most importantly, it had to be easy to ride,” says David Roth, Co-Founder and Chief Engineer for Roth Motors. “In order for electric transportation to have a significant environmental, social, and economic impact, vehicles must become accessibly priced. Motorboards are a relatively inexpensive alternative for green-minded consumers who may be hesitant or unable to spend tens of thousands of dollars for a hybrid”.

For those 2000X owners disappointed that their Motorboard as been superseded, Roth is offering an upgrade service to convert your 2000X into a 2000XR, however this will require sending your board to Palm Desert, California, where the old battery and charger will be swapped out for new ones and the Ensolite padding added at a cost of US$450 for parts and labor.

For further info visit Roth Motors

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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