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California winery to convert to 100% solar power

By

September 17, 2007

EOS winery gates

EOS winery gates

The system will use state-of-the-art single axis technology that actively tracks the sun’s path as it moves across the sky throughout the day. “Standard solar power systems harvest the sun’s power only at peak levels during the day,” said Florian Edler, CEO of SunTechnics Energy Systems, Inc. “The system that we created for EOS will follow the sun all day avoiding any shading. This will allow EOS to operate on 100% solar power in the most efficient way possible.” EOS believes the system can save the equivalent of 360 acres of planted trees and over 21,000 tons of CO_2 saved over 25 years.

“Because of the abundant sunshine, California is the perfect place to harvest solar power and utilize it to create our award-winning wines,” said Jeff Hopmayer, the new owner of The EOS Estate Winery. “In Paso Robles, we are blessed with the perfect climate for growing grapes. By using alternative energy, we are doing our part to protect our environment while continuing to produce the highest quality wine.”

EOS worked closely on the deal with the City of Paso Robles. “Not only is this the first winery in the county to convert completely to solar power, it also is one of the largest projects like this in the state.” said Frank Mecham, Mayor of Paso Roble. California’s tax rebates are vital in encouraging businesses to convert to solar power. “With California’s tax rebates and available federal tax breaks, businesses like The EOS Estate Winery can recoup the initial investments more quickly,” said Mark Mosher, Acting Executive Director for Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s California Commission for Jobs and Economic Growth. “We commend EOS Estate Winery for making an important investment in the future of our state.”

For further info visit EOS and SunTechnics.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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