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The Wireless PHONEJack – now any telecom device can go wireless

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August 13, 2006

The Wireless PHONEJack – now any telecom device can go wireless

The Wireless PHONEJack – now any telecom device can go wireless

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August 14, 2006 We’re predicting that Danish company RTX’s new wireless phone jack is going to be a huge best seller. The Wireless PHONEJack provides a simple, cost effective method for getting a phone line to where it is needed. The Wireless PHONEJack has two main applications, firstly in providing a phone line extension where there is no phone socket and secondly in enabling remote phones to connect to VoIP ATAs. Once connected the Wireless PHONEJack creates a 50 meters radius wireless phone network using DECT radio technology. This allows a user to connect an analogue phone device such as a phone, answering machines, fax or conference phone wirelessly to a PSTN line or VoIP ATA. The Wireless PHONEJack can wirelessly connect up to 4 separate phones within a 50 meter radius of the ATA, making VoIP calls a reality not just from near the ATA but elsewhere in the home or office. Likewise a user can connect up to 4 phone devices to a PSTN phone line without the need to run cables to places where they want the phones without the need to run expensive and messy cables. And installation is easy - it takes less than one minute to plug the Wireless PHONEJack into a power point near an existing phone line and set up it up to route phone calls. The Wireless Phone Jack is available from in Europe (EUR65), Australia (AUD$100) and the United States (US$90) immediately.

Many would agree that it seems paradoxical to install long, unsightly and expensive phone wires in an age when practically any other device in the home is wireless. Nonetheless, many homes still have only one phone socket but several devices in need of its capacity. Every time a new telecom device (phone, all-in-one office printer with built-in fax, set top box, or VoIP ATA) is brought into the home; this requires either new phone wire installations or placing metres of wires around the house.

Thus, expensive and time-consuming work, messy tangles of wires below desks, alongside walls, through ceilings, upstairs and downstairs are everyday realities in many homes. Many people seem to have settled with this situation, while others have invested large sums of money and time installing ingenious architraves to hide at least part of the wires cluttering their house. According to RTX Products, however, things do not have to be like this.

RTX has a long history and years of expertise within the development of advanced solutions for wireless communication. Notably, RTX Products is engaged in the development and production of niche products. "At the moment, we consider the Wireless PHONEJack to be a niche product, but it certainly has a broader potential because it represents the fulfilment of world-wide needs", says sales and marketing director Jens Jungersen. "The Wireless PHONEJack is truly an interesting product. Practically everybody needs more than one phone socket in their home and who wouldn't prefer these to be wireless? That was basically our background for developing the Wireless PHONEJack", Mr. Jungersen continues.

The Wireless PHONEJack has an operating range of up to 50 metres and in practice, this means that it covers all floors and rooms of the house. Easy installation is another key feature of the Wireless PHONEJack. A base unit is simply connected to the phone socket, while an extension unit is plugged into any power socket within a range of 50 metres. All without incurring any installation time or costs, as the Wireless PHONEJack offers genuine plug-and-play installation: Just plug in and communicate.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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