May 23, 2006 The corporate and productivity segment of the mobile phone market is about to go mainstream with the release of the much anticipated Motorola Q on May 31. Designed for roadwarrior customers, the ultra-thin Moto Q is an all-in-one device aimed squarely at the Blackberry and runs a QWERTY keyboard, Microsoft Windows Mobile 5.0 software, has EVDO wireless capabilities, a QVGA screen, Bluetooth 1.2, 1.3MP camera and thumbwheel scroll. First announced in mid-2005, Motorola is claiming that with Windows Mobile software, the Q puts a "mini notebook" in customers' pockets by providing enough power for them to leave their laptop at home to check e-mail, review presentations, and stay connected for a week or a weekend.

The Q will initially be exclusively available through Verizon.

Features of the Moto Q from Verizon Wireless include:

    -- Integrated Bluetooth 1.2 wireless technology for communicating with compatible headsets, car kits and certain other devices equipped with Bluetooth technology

-- EV-DO access for fast downloads of data, e-mail and large attachments

-- Wireless Sync for anytime connectivity with e-mail, calendar and contacts synchronization

-- Thinnest QWERTY device in the world - 11.5mm includes a familiar thumbwheel to enhance the navigation experience

-- Seamless access to corporate applications, messaging, organizational tools and IT support, from across the campus and around the world

-- Synchronization with e-mail, calendar, contacts, and tasks entries, regardless of platform or ISP

-- Integrated with Windows Mobile 5.0 software for the convenience of users and IT with access to Yahoo!, Hotmail and other POP3

-- All standard desktop document views supported including: Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Adobe Acrobat, etc.

-- Supports audio and video formats

-- Dual, stereo-quality speakers

-- Easy integration with existing IT systems for enhanced IT support

-- Enabled for leading corporate e-mail solutions

-- Flexibility enables loading of standard corporate VPN

-- Password authentication helps ensure network integrity