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NeThrone promises a new computing environment

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January 6, 2006

NeThrone promises a new computing environment

NeThrone promises a new computing environment

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January 7, 2006 Anyone spending eight plus hours a day on a computer knows that using a conventional desk and chair is not the answer to ergonomic happiness. A quick recap of the evolution of the human body will show we’ve been a work in progress for countless millennia, that desks and chairs are a very recent invention, and that the lure of the computer is causing millions of people every day to have sore shoulders, necks, backs etcetera There has to be a better way and we’ve written about quite a few alternative chairs in recent years including the Topform computer lounge chair, Netsurfer Ergonomic Computer Chair and the very promising MYPCE (My Personal Computer Environment). Now there’s a new chair we clocked at the 2006 CES which we think has a big future – the NETHRONE. Highly adjustable (including the keyboard, screen and every aspect of the seat), very comfortable, with electronic adjustment, massage facilities, and a wow factor just short of 10 on the Richter scale, the chair goes on sale later this month at US$2500 in blue, red, green, purple, and yellow. Extensive image library inside.

Highly adjustable (including the keyboard, screen and every aspect of the seat), very comfortable, with electronic adjustment, massage facilities, and a wow factor just short of carnal, the chair goes on sale later this month at US$2500 in blue, red, green, purple, and yellow.

Probably the best aspect of the NeThrone is that the angle of the seat can be adjusted to take the pressure off any given point of the anatomy. Check out this flash demonstration for an idea of what’s possible.

Dave Weinstein

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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