Purchasing new hardware? Read our latest product comparisons
ADVERTISEMENT

Thin is IN: NEC follows Razr ultra-thin mobile

By

September 22, 2005

Image Gallery (3 images)

September 23, 2005 NEC this week launched the world's thinnest fold-type mobile phone onto the Hong Kong market and will follow shortly with introductions into Italy, Russia, Australia and China. The phone is very reminiscent of the trend-setting Motorola Razr with its thin clam-shell design. It boasts slim measurements of 47.9mm (width) X 101.5mm (height) X 11.9mm (depth; when folded) and a weight of 96g. Supporting mobile-internet and GSM/GPRS, it is equipped with a 1.9 inch 65,000 colour display in addition to a 1.3 mega pixel camera. The sub-screen with an organic light emitting display is convenient for scrolling text messages. The phone is also loaded with a wide variety of features including PictBridge, MP3, Java and Bluetooth.

"This ultra-slim, clam-shell type mobile phone is a symbol of NEC's leading position in the area of mobile technology," said Susumu Otani, Associate Senior Vice President and head of Mobile Terminals Operations Unit at NEC Corporation. "We will continue to strive to offer the latest, most innovative and most attractive mobile terminal solutions on the market. Boasting compact shape and the latest technologies, our phones allow our customers to choose the right phone for their individual needs in all of our target markets across the globe.”

Up to 64-polyphonic ring tones and two minutes of movie shooting can be enjoyed by the user.

In March 2004, NEC introduced the world's smallest, slimmest, card-shaped, camera-equipped mobile phone to the Chinese market. After its launch, NEC's mobile competence continued to draw attention worldwide due to the launch of its handwriting-enabled phone, as well as its TV tuner-embedded and whole touch panel display card-shaped models.

ADVERTISEMENT
About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
Tags
Post a Comment

Login with your Gizmag account:

Related Articles
Looking for something? Search our articles
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT