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Ingenious Bag Handle

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July 18, 2005

July 19, 2005 Proof that an ingenious new invention doesn’t require Bluetooth, a 5-GHz processor and a room full of MIT graduates. As anyone who has ever struggled to carry a half dozen plastic grocery bags will tell you, there has to be a better way t han having those plastic bags cut into your fingers and cut off the circulation. Designed to carry 50 lbs. of stuffed grocery bags, the EZcarry soft-grip handle is a comfortable soft-grip handle that makes carrying grocery bags, department store bags, dry cleaning hangers, and more, much easier. It works by evenly distributing the pressure of shopping bags across the hand so the weight no longer cuts into a person's hand, palm, or fingers. Shoppers just hold onto a cushy purple and blue handle.

Now some readers may already have seen the EZcarry through its launch on QVC in April, and distribution is already underway in England, Canada, Portugal and 20 US States but there’s still a bunch of people out there to marvel at the simplicity of such a logical everyday item.

You can buy the Ezcarry online at Minimus

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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