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Rodeo Bull-riding machine

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June 4, 2005

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June 5, 2005 The hospitality and promotional opportunities at a F1 or MotoGP Grand prix are limited only by your imagination and budget, with neither seeming to present many problems. This year we’ve seen the entry of Red Bull into Formula 1 with spectacular results on track and even more spectacular results in the hospitality area. Now Ducati has come up with a new way to entertain the bevy of actors, industrial barons, supermodels and A-list celebs that drop by to hang out when the Grand Prix is in town – a mechanical bull. Motorcycle racing being as competitive as it is, more than a few opposition riders called past to try their hand.

Once the circus was set up in Ducati’s home Italian Grand Prix at Mugello earlier this week, the team set up a Wild West evening complete wwith barbeque and western music and the centrepiece of affairs was a mechanical bull with all-comers invited to try their hand at rodeo bull riding.

Motorcycle racers being crazy at heart, it didn’t take lonmg for word to spread through the motor homes and although contractual obligations prevented many of those who tried their hand from being photographed, needless to say there was a long list of top motorcycle riders awaiting a turn on the machine.

Ducati’s MotoGP team of Spaniard Carlos Checa and loris capirossi both tried the beastie – Checa rides with the symbol of the bull on his leathers. The sign of the bull is said to represent courage and character.

Both riders had proven conclusively that they ride motorcycles far better than they do bulls in the race.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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