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Aston Martin DBR9 debuts

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January 20, 2004

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Aston Martin Racing has revealed further details of its all-new DBR9 that will spearhead the marque's return to international motor racing in 2005.

This new GT racing car, which is based on the latest Aston Martin production sports car, DB9, is being prepared by Aston Martin Racing's partners, Prodrive, based at Banbury, UK. Prodrive is responsible for the design, development and management of the DBR9 racing programme.

The first DBR9 is being prepared now and will compete during 2005 in selected international sports car events, including Le Mans 24 Hours. Three Aston Martin Racing Works teams will then be appointed to compete in major international sports cars series. These will be independent teams each racing two DBR9s with the full factory support of Aston Martin Racing. Aston Martin Racing will also make a very limited number of DBR9 racing cars available to selected customers. These cars will be prepared to the same specification as the Works cars.

"The design of DB9 lends itself to be translated perfectly into the DBR9 race car," said Jeremy Main, Aston Martin's Director of Product Development & Motorsport. "While DBR9 has been planned for outright performance, every surface sculpture and design detail has been developed to the same high standards as our road cars." Power for the DB9 comes from a 450bhp all-alloy, 48-valve, 6.0-litre V12 engine which gives it a top speed of more than 180mph (300kph). The DB9 is offered with a six-speed automatic or a six-speed manual transmission. The DBR9 will naturally be far more powerful than the DB9.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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