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Findable Golfball System

Findable Golfball System

Findable Golfball System

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A new type of golf ball tracking system could render the lost ball penalty a thing of the past. Radar Golf Inc. has launched the new system which uses an embedded RFID tag in the balls and a compact hand-held device which locates the golf ball.The handheld unit "beeps" when pointed at the ball and is effective at a distance of 40 to 125 feet. The tag is extremely small and is built into the ball at the time of manufacture. The tag could be easily included in any commercial golf ball though until that happens, you'll need to use Radar Golf's proprietary balls which conform with U.S. Golf Association rules."Golfers tell us they see our system for finding golf balls as a way to improve their score rapidly and get more satisfaction and enjoyment from the game," said Steve Harari, CEO of Radar Golf. "By minimizing lost ball penalties, we estimate that the average golfer will improve per-round scores by an average of two to four strokes. Golf course operators and manufacturers also stand to gain from a faster pace of play and more total rounds played."Patti Hayes, an advisor to Radar Golf, said, "I have met with representatives of the leading manufacturers of golf balls, and they see a great deal of opportunity with this product." Hayes, a former professional golfer and owner of a large retail golf store, is a golf industry consultant and women's high school golf coach. "With my high school players, I've seen first-hand the problem of losing balls in the fairway because of heavy leaf coverage in the fall (autumn). I think golfers will be thrilled with the product."Harari said the company is in discussions with golf ball manufacturers to license and distribute the Radar Golf products in North America, Asia and Europe. www.radargolf.com.

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Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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