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'Last Resort' Parachute for High Rise Structures

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February 25, 2005

February 26, 2005 It's a scenario made even more frightening by graphic television footage in recent times - trapped at the top of a burning building with exits cut-off facing the gruesome choice between jumping or perishing in flames. Developed as a "last resort" in such an emergency, Evacuchute is specifically designed and engineered for building evacuations - the static line parachute is automatically deployed in less than 1.5 seconds and moves the individual away from the building to ensure a safe, low-impact deployment and a controlled descent at low altitude.

It's a scenario made even more frightening by graphic television footage in recent times - trapped at the top of a burning building with exits cut-off facing the gruesome choice between jumping or perishing in flames.

Developed as a "last resort" in such an emergency, Evacuchute is specifically designed and engineered for building evacuations - the static line parachute is automatically deployed in less than 1.5 seconds and moves the individual away from the building to ensure a safe, low-impact deployment and a controlled descent at low altitude.

Co-founders Jeremy Ireland and Michael Shuken realised the need for this product after the 9/11 attack in the US and not surprisingly, Evacuchute has experienced an increase in sales and inquires due to heightened awareness of terrorism during 2003.

Evacuchute is the only rescue parachute tested from a high-rise building using real people according to the manufacturers and video footage can be viewed at the website listed below. Key features of the patent-pending design include special air vents that move the user forward and away from the building, the ability to open fast and in the correct direction as well as slow descent and stability in turbulent conditions.

The Evacuchute has been tested to safely deploy from heights of 42 metres (approximately 15 floors above ground) and Evacuchutes designed specifically for fire rescue personnel are also available.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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