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Backyard pool that goes on forever

Backyard pool that goes on forever

Backyard pool that goes on forever

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Anything less than a 25m pool can make swimming a frustrating, inefficient means of exercise, and unless you have the spare acreage, cutting a few laps of the backyard pool is usually out of the question. A new approach from Endless Pools in the US has changed the rules by transferring the concept of the jogging treadmill into a 2.4 x 4.5m pool that provides its own adjustable current, enabling you to swim all day without a single turn.Suitable for indoor or outdoor installation, the Endless Pool provides controlled temperature as well adjustable current from zero to racing pace.The pool is designed to release minimal humidity when covered and the Water Quality System, it is virtually odour free according to the manufacturers.Applications for the Endless Pool include water exercise, aquatic therapy and plain relaxation in addition to swimming for all ability levels.A "deep end" option is available for vertically oriented exercises like walking and running in place against the current in chest-deep water. Installation possibilities are further boosted by the modular construction - all pieces can fit through a 60cm gap making existing spaces like basements and garages candidates for pool placement.Endless Pools are sold direct from the factory in suburban Philadelphia and although the pools have been exported to various part of the globe, there are no examples in Australia as yet, according to Chris Wackman of Endless Pools.The standard Endless Pool system, which includes steel walls and liner, the adjustable current and return system and water filtration and heating system, costs US$17,900

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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