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B-King Concept Bike

B-King Concept Bike

B-King Concept Bike

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Styled in the likeness of a Pit Bull, it has a supercharged version of the most powerful motor in mainstream motorcycling, the frame, brakes and suspension of a MotoGP racer, plus the most sophisticated digital electronics and communications package yet assembled for a bike - it is the Suzuki B-King concept bike. Another first with the B-King is that it will be the first motorcycle to come with its own helmet - the B-King is the first motorcycle to be designed for use with a heads-up display, so the rider does not need to unfocus from the road to read the the speedo, tacho or navigation instructions from the GPS system. In keeping with its macho image, Suzuki has banished the use of plastic in the construction of the machine - it is made entirely of carbon fibre, metal and leather. Unofficially, the bike is producing 250 horsepower, and hence it's not surprising it wears a very wide set of road

Styled in the likeness of a Pit Bull, it has a supercharged version of the most powerful motor in mainstream motorcycling, the frame, brakes and suspension of a MotoGP racer, plus the most sophisticated digital electronics and communications package yet assembled for a bike - it is the Suzuki B-King concept bike.

Another first with the B-King is that it will be the first motorcycle to come with its own helmet - the B-King is the first motorcycle to be designed for use with a heads-up display, so the rider does not need to unfocus from the road to read the the speedo, tacho or navigation instructions from the GPS system. In keeping with its macho image, Suzuki has banished the use of plastic in the construction of the machine - it is made entirely of carbon fibre, metal and leather.

Unofficially, the bike is producing 250 horsepower, and hence it's not surprising it wears a very wide set of road - new tyres were purpose-built for the project - a 150 at the front and 240 at the rear, 5cm wider than the 310kmh Hayabusa from which it gets its donk. Though its horsepower figures are eye-catching, it is the electronic communications and information systems which will give it landmark status. Starting is not done with a key - the B-King has fingerprint recognition, making it harder to steal than a bike with a key. The anti-theft aspects don't end there.

If someone attempts to steal your B-King, it will dial your mobile phone, allowing you to converse directly with the person tampering with it via a speaker and inbuilt microphone. In addition to conversing with said thieves, you can flash the lights and sound the horn at will, and if that doesn't deter them and they truck it away, you can track its travels using the GPS system.The advanced telemetry and inbuilt computer can communicate with your local Suzuki service centre and it is capable of self-diagnosis.

The wireless connection can also link to the internet for traffic and weather information and you can also read and send email.The frame on the B-King is pure MotoGP, being laser-welded with a plazma-welded swingarm which is mounted directly to the gearbox with the engine acting as a stressed member.

The front-end could have been borrowed directly from Kenny Roberts GSV-R - tree-trunk diameter, heavily-braced upside down forks, with four-piston Brembos. In addition to roll-on accidental wheelies up to somewhere arund 200 kmh, B-King riders will be able to produce the BEST stoppies (front wheel-stands), and when it's all said and done, that's what this is - an all-purpose, completely over-the-top stunt bike. What it does best is overkill!

Suzuki recently showed the machine in the UK, specifically to canvas opinion as to whether the bike should be produced - a staggering 96% said they wanted the bike to be made available, with 50% of those opting for a non-supercharged, 175 bhp version at US$20,000 and 50% wanting the supercharged 250 bhp version for US$30,000.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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