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Advanced Neuromodulation Systems

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June 4, 2004

Advanced Neuromodulation Systems has been given approval to begin marketing its Genesis Totally Implantable Pulse Generator (IPG). The Genesis uses Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) technology to manage chronic pain by interfering with the transmission of pain signals sent to the brain.

There are two types of SCS technology - Radio Frequency (RF) and IPG. RF devices use an externally rechargeable power transmitter, worn on a belt like a pager, that directs radio frequency energy to an implanted receiver. The receiver is connected to implanted leads containing a number of electrodes and converts this energy into mild electrical impulses that stimulate targeted nerve fibres and interupt pain signals. IPG devices incorporate a small battery within the implanted device to create the electrical impulses. Because the power source is implanted, surgery is required to change the battery and hence IPGs are best prescribed for chronic pain where less power and programming flexibility is required.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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