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Electric Toyota RAV4 unveiled in L.A.

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November 18, 2010

Rav 4 EV demonstrator dashboard

Rav 4 EV demonstrator dashboard

Image Gallery (19 images)

When Toyota and Tesla announced a partnership earlier this year one of the stated aims was to collaborate on an electric version of the RAV4 – here it is. Unveiled at the Los Angeles Auto Show, the RAV4 EV Demonstration Vehicle is based on the current combustion engine model with modifications to the suspension and steering plus minor styling changes like a new front bumper, grille and head lamps and of course – the inclusion of an electric powertrain and Tesla supplied battery pack. Toyota points out that there are many decisions yet to be made before the final specs of the RAV4 EV – which is slated to go into production in 2012 – are finalized.

A demonstration fleet of 35 vehicles is planned with a target range of 100 miles in "actual road driving patterns" along with "driveability characteristics as close to the conventional RAV4 as possible."

The vehicle currently being tested has a mid-30 kwh range lithium metal oxide battery and Toyota says that despite the extra 220 pounds that the battery adds over the conventional V6 model, the RAV4 EV demonstrator will accelerate from zero to sixty almost as fast.

Toyota/Tesla collaboration results in new RAV4 EV technology demonstrator

Aside from the revised bumper, grille and lights, the demonstrator has been given EV badging and a custom paint color plus interior styling changes including multimedia dash displays, push-button shifter and dashboard meters to monitor the battery and electrical system. Components have also been rearranged to cater for the electric drive, but this has not resulted in any loss of cargo space.

There's no firm commitment on production volume, price, business model or final specs at this stage of the process, but Toyota hoes to have the EV to market in 2012.

Tesla will build the battery and related parts at its new Californian factory, but no final decision has been made on where final assembly will take place.

This is actually the second-generation Toyota RAV4 EV. The company released 1,484 first-generation RAV4 EVs between 1998 and 2003, 746 of which are still on the road.

Toyota has a dedicated RAV4 EV site here.

About the Author
Noel McKeegan After a misspent youth at law school, Noel began to dabble in tech research, writing and things with wheels that go fast. This bus dropped him at the door of a freshly sprouted Gizmag.com in 2002. He has been Gizmag's Editor-in-Chief since 2007.   All articles by Noel McKeegan
3 Comments

The original 1997 NiMh version was pretty close in performance:

The RAV4 EV closely resembles the regular internal combustion engine (ICE) version - without a tailpipe - and has a governed top speed of 78 mph (~126 km/h) with a range of 100 to 120 miles (160 to 190 km). The 95 amp-hour NiMH battery pack has a capacity of 27 kWh, charges inductively and has proven to be surprisingly durable. Some RAV4 EVs have achieved over 150,000 miles (240,000 km) on the original battery pack. It was also one of the few vehicles with a single speed automatic transmission at that time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_RAV4_EV

William Volk
19th November, 2010 @ 03:05 pm PST

In 4WD revving the V6 up the autonomy is similar with both propulsion alternatives ;-)

Gerfried Hans
21st November, 2010 @ 08:59 am PST

220lbs heavier? Without the V6? This is crazy. When is a major car company going to make an ultralight, very low drag vehicle? The technology is here. The need for high efficiency energy saving design is here. What are they waiting for? I guess we will just have to depend on a small private business venture to supply our needs (again). To bad the small businesses are taxed and the big corps get the bailouts leaving less venture capital. Why do we allow this? If we keep it up some of us will be driving Chinese autos and the rest pedaling or walking.

voluntaryist
24th November, 2010 @ 02:00 pm PST
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