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Earthquake tactlile transducers give gamers and movie buffs good vibrations

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February 1, 2010

Earthquake tactile transducers deliver a lot of bang for your buck to enhance your movie-w...

Earthquake tactile transducers deliver a lot of bang for your buck to enhance your movie-watching or gaming pleasure. Just make sure your fillings are tight

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For home theater enthusiasts or gamers who enjoy the deep thud of a good subwoofer but want a little more “jolt” without the extra noise, Earthquake Sound Corp. has added to its range of tactile transducers with the Q10B and MQB-1 that, when fitted to a theater chair or platform, can virtually loosen your fillings. Along with visualizing and hearing, low frequency sound adds a third sense which brings people further into the realm of virtual reality of movies and games.

Q10B unit

The Q10B has heaps of grunt to deliver bone-jarring effects through seats, platforms and gaming chairs while accurately reproducing the feeling of many natural and man-made sounds – like disasters such as earthquakes and tornadoes or man-made items such as rockets, guns, explosions and car crashes, plus the most intricate sound effects and all styles of music. Of course, if you find your vision is blurring due to the vibrations your body is experiencing, you can always turn down the amplifier.

Earthquake’s Q10B can handle up to 1000W and the manufacturers say the unit is capable of efficiently utilizing each watt to its full potential. It does this because of its floating magnetic system that is much more powerful and musically sensitive than most typical loudspeakers and other tactile devices on the market, they say. The Q10B also offers accurate low frequency response and clarity (range: 5-40Hz) which reaches far lower than existing low frequency systems. Moreover, the Q10B is military grade tough, so it is virtually indestructible and with only one moving part is practically maintenance free. The Q10B measures 3 9/16 inches tall x 6 1/3 inches wide, has 2Ohm impedance and uses a flat wire aluminum voice coil.

MQB-1 unit

A slightly smaller unit is the MQB-1 Tactile Transducer. This device is easier to mount to office chairs and thrones for a localized gaming experience or to add a bit more life to your music.

While smaller in size, it can still deliver the goods for the home theater.

The MQB-1 uses the same technology as its big brother the Q10B which Earthquake says allows it to be the most powerful, accurate, and sensitive mini tactile transducer on the market today. At only three inches tall and 3 1/8 inches in diameter including the mounting feet, this unique little hot rod can be mounted in almost any location. Plus, it stays running cool and efficient for hours.

XJR-Series amplifiers

Earthquake says that its XJ line of amplifiers delivers the tools audiophiles need correctly adjust a room acoustically. The company says other manufacturers claim that they have room correction built into their amplifiers, which in fact is only level adjustment by volume.

Earthquake’s new XJ amps have true room correction that take into consideration time/reflection and refraction. Instead of just trying to equalize rooms by adjusting the volume these new amplifiers first fix arrival time then equalization. The new 99 percent efficient XJ earthquake amplifiers address the actual phase correction problem along with the room EQ.

The XJ line consists of two high performance power amplifiers: the XJ-300R (300W) and XJ-600R (600W) which have also been matched to the new tactile transducers.

The Q10B tactile transducer sells for around US$599 and the MQB-1 for US$325. The XJ-300R amplifier costs US$550 and the XJ-600R will set you back US$1,399. All items are available online and from many AV stockists.

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