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Capture Camera Clip for DSLR sharp shooters

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September 20, 2011

After attaching a plate to the bottom of a camera and then clamping the Capture Camera Cli...

After attaching a plate to the bottom of a camera and then clamping the Capture Camera Clip's main chassis to a belt or bag strap, users can grab and shoot the DSLR as quick as a gunslinger from a cheesy Western

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Engineer Peter Dering says that when he was unable to find a commercially-available clip for his digital SLR (DSLR) that would allow him to safely secure it to his belt yet make it instantly accessible, he designed and created his own. After attaching a plate to the bottom of a camera and then clamping the Capture Camera Clip's main chassis to a belt or bag strap, users can grab and shoot the DSLR as quick as a gunslinger from a cheesy Western and get the snap that might otherwise have been missed. A few weeks after securing production funding through Kickstarter, the device has now attracted the attention of the folks over at Photojojo and been added to its arsenal of must-have camera accessories.

If you think that Peak Design's Capture Camera Clip system looks a might familiar, Brando's camera and video waist belt lock which we covered last year is probably what you have in mind. Unlike Brando's much cheaper product, Dering's Clip features a two-piece die-cast aluminum chassis and backplate with two adjustable, low profile screws at either end that allow users to clamp the Clip to belts or straps up to an inch thick. The clamping bolts are made from cold-forged zinc alloy, there's three stainless steel springs in the device, and two assembly screws.

The connection plate is attached to the bottom of the DSLR camera via a screw into the tri...

Like Brando's lock, a connection plate slides in and out of the main chassis. The plate on the Clip sports a camera connection screw, and a neoprene pad, and is secured to the bottom of the camera via the tripod mount - for maximum tripod mount compatibility, the Clip's plate will fit any Arca-Swiss-style tripod head. Four tabs are positioned around the plate for those photographers who like to use hand straps.

With the main chassis secured to a belt or strap and the plate fitted to the bottom of the camera, users can slide the DSLR into the Clip with a nimble slide and click action. When opportunity knocks, the camera can be liberated from the Clip via a Delrin thermoplastic quick release button. A redundant twist lock opposite the release button prevents accidental release when engaged - adding piece of mind when out downhill skiing, kayaking, hiking or mountain biking.

The system is said to be better than a camera strap because there's no pressure on your neck or shoulders and your camera won't dangerously swing about when you break into a run, and faster than pulling open a bag, grabbing the camera and then snapping the shot. It negates the need for cumbersome and often expensive slings, holsters and vests, and the lock can withstand well over 100 pounds of force and is weatherproof.

It's available now for US$79 from Photojojo.

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About the Author
Paul Ridden While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.   All articles by Paul Ridden
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9 Comments

I have one issue with this product and that is the damage it could cause to a camera's tripod mount. The tripod mount on a camera is not meant to support the weight of a camera in this position. Especially with a large lens. The strain placed on the tripod mount could easily break or disconnect it within the camera with costly repairs being needed. Proceed with caution.

"adding piece of mind when out downhill skiing, kayaking, hiking or mountain biking." is a bit of a marketing stretch. Other than the hiking, I don't recall many people wearing belts while participating in these activities. Who brings their expensive DSLR into a kayak with them where it could get soaked?

Gene Jordan
20th September, 2011 @ 09:56 am PDT

"he was unable to find a commercially-available clip for his digital SLR (DSLR) that would allow him to safely secure it to his belt yet make it instantly accessible"

He didn't look very hard:

http://www.spiderholster.com/

http://www.spiderholster.com/black-widow-holster.html

http://bgrip.com/

http://opteka.com/qsp.aspx

http://gadget.brando.com/camera-waist-belt-lock_p01220c057d001.html (which yes, Gizmag has covered)...

Keith Reeder
20th September, 2011 @ 10:46 am PDT

Gene, there are several products that do this already and are used by pros with heavier bodies and lenses than shown in the picture in this article. Look at this category at B&H if you are curious: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ns=p_PRICE_2|1&ci=4093&N=4177581484&srtclk=sort

Ben Chernicoff
20th September, 2011 @ 10:51 am PDT

I really liked the idea of these belt holsters when they first came out, but...

The truth is that their usefulness and versatility are significantly diminished if, like me, you live in a part of the world where wearing warm/waterproof shells and layers is necessary for a goodly part of the year.

Keith Reeder
20th September, 2011 @ 01:14 pm PDT

It seems like carrying a DSLR like this would result in smashing that camera against something, like a desk, doorway, other person or similar waist high obstruction. And no strap to help prevent the Dropsies.

fenriq
21st September, 2011 @ 09:19 am PDT

Ben, unfortunately B&H aren't going to gives us a list of all the people with broken tripod mounts from using devices like these. The manufacturer designed the tripod mount for the camera to sit on horizontally, held in part by gravity. It falls under the same category as leaving a camera attached to a tripod while carrying the tripod. Without the support underneath it, the tripod mount could break and it wouldn't likely be covered by a warranty.

Gene Jordan
21st September, 2011 @ 03:27 pm PDT

Gene, I'm not clear on your concern re potential damage to the tripod mount. I use a quick release plate and my tripod head allows the camera to be rotated to a vertical instead of horizontal position such that the camera weight is 90 degrees to the direction of the tripod screw. I often use my DSLR in that position and don't think the high end tripod head manufacturers would allow the vertical position if there was danger of damaging the camera.

Sailfree
5th October, 2011 @ 09:13 pm PDT

Tripod mounts are designed to handle the weight of the camera and a lot more in any position. I've had a Spider Holster for a few years, and with a vertical grip and a 70-200/2.8 zoom (total about 2 kg) I've never had any problem with any camera I put in it. I frequently hike for miles with the camera on my hip. I've never, in the 6 years I've been frequenting internet forums, heard of a tripod mount breaking, and a lot of people are using Spider holsters, Rapid straps, hand straps, QR plates and L-brackets.

Joris van den Heuvel
27th November, 2012 @ 12:36 am PST

I have looked at the various designs and they have similar defects. One needs two hands to use them and they put too much weight on the trouser belt and they will quickly wear a hole in the user's pant leg.

If such a device cannot support a full sized DSLR with a 70-200mm f2.8 lens attached it provides no significant value for the photographer.

Calson
20th May, 2013 @ 10:46 am PDT
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