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Digital Cameras

Slow motion weapon: Phantom Flex camera shoots full HD at 2,800 frames per second

High-speed photography specialist Vision Research has unleashed its next-gen video camera - the Phantom Flex. The unit is billed as the world’s most flexible digital cinema camera and it's no idle boast - the specs speak for themselves. Packing a four mega-pixel color CMOS sensor, the Phantom Flex captures a maximum resolution of 2560x1600 shooting at 1,560 frames-per-second (fps) which can be increased to 2,800 when you step the resolution down to full-HD (1920x1080). At 720p HD resolution the maximum recording speed hits 6,100 fps, at 640x480 it's a whopping 13,000 fps and if you really want to trade in resolution for speed, try 330,000 fps at 256 x 8. Clearly this is a serious a weapon for capturing slow motion footage. Read More

Carl Zeiss introduces dedicated cine lenses for Canon and Nikon DSLRs

With the trend for digital SLRs to include additional video capture it was only a matter of time before dedicated prime and zoom cine lenses were offered to hybrid photographers and videographers. At the NAB Show in Las Vegas this week, Carl Zeiss introduced an entire new range of cine lenses, set for launch in June. As well as being designed especially for DSLRs, all forthcoming lens models will be available with interchangeable Canon EF, Nikon F and Arri PL mounts.Read More

Gobandit actioncam records location, speed and altitude of your adventures

There was a time when budget actioncams (or helmetcams, or whatever you want to call them) were limited to just one or two models. Now the options abound, with manufacturers adding special features to set their cameras apart from the rest. We’ve seen actioncams with laser-assisted alignment, extra-wide lenses and anti-glare LCD screens, just to name a few. With the gobandit GPSHD, we’re about to see a camera that offers something else yet - a recorded onscreen display of the location, altitude and speed at which your footage was shot.Read More

Turning image noise into a good thing

Noise in images is generally held to be a bad thing, but engineers from Princeton University have used a nonlinear material to steal energy from image noise to reveal hidden or obscured objects. The engineers see the technology as potentially paving the way for improvements to radar systems, sonograms and stenography offering the possibility of allowing pilots to see through fog and doctors to look inside the human body without surgeryRead More

JVC to show off 1080p GY-HM790 ProHD camcorder at NAB 2010

JVC has announced a new addition to its ProHD line of camcorders and will be showing it off at the forthcoming NAB 2010 show in Las Vegas. Capable of shooting in high definition 1080p, the GY-HM790 ships with a 14x Canon HD lens, records to SDHC via dual slots and benefits from a host of modular possibilities.Read More

Open Camera Control uses a Nintendo DS to operate a DSLR

Photographers looking to create High Dynamic Range images in the field have traditionally been faced with heavy equipment and the lack of user controls offered by digital SLR cameras. HDR Labs took a Nintendo DS gaming device, created a custom camera interface, loaded on some innovative imaging apps and the Open Camera Control Project was born. The open source, DIY controller puts powerful image processing control right in the palm of your hand.Read More

Toshiba's CAMILEO compact camcorders to hit US this month

Toshiba is heading for the U.S. compact digital camcorder market with the introduction of the full-HD Camelio range. Due to hit stores on April 19, the new line is made up of the pocket-sized, 3.5 ounce S20 and two compact touch-screen models - the H30 and X100. All units include HDMI output, 3-inch LCD monitor, Internet upload hotkey and support for SD/SDHC memory cards.Read More

Leaf releases 56MP Aptus-II 10R digital camera back

Leaf has just announced a new professional-level 56 megapixel digital camera back with the world's widest medium format internal rotating sensor, touchscreen display, 16-bit color and 12-stop dynamic range. The Aptus-II 10R is compatible with most of the Hasselblad V series as well as other camera systems from the likes of Mamiya and Fuji via an adapter.Read More

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