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Digital Cameras


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Holographic laser projection technology to transform any surface into a touch screen

By - July 21, 2009 3 Pictures
Light Blue Optics (LBO) has received an injection of funds to further its development of, among other things, a holographic laser projection technology. The big news is that this technology can be touch-enabled, meaning any flat surface, such as a table, can be instantly transformed into a touch-sensitive display, eliminating the need for a touch screen and allowing users to directly interact with multimedia content. Read More
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iBum chair automatically photocopies your butt

By - July 16, 2009 1 Picture
Since the invention and proliferation of the photocopier, office clowns around the world have been united in a single desire - particularly around Christmas party time. Ignoring the jagged, buttock-splitting hazard of broken glass and the virtual certainty of dismissal should they be discovered, thousands of pranksters annually drop their strides or hike their skirts and enjoy the age-old ritual of photocopying their bums for their innocent co-workers to find in the out tray. Now, a Japanese designer has facilitated the process by designing a chair that automatically scans and prints a photo of your backside. Call me a traditionalist, but if it's not naughty, a bit dangerous and a blatant abuse of equipment, I can't see why you'd bother photocopying your bum at all. In fact, to me, the iBum chair seems to remove all fun from the act whatsoever. Read More
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New technique reduces processing power needed for facial recognition

By - July 14, 2009 1 Picture
The human brain has an amazing capacity for recognizing patterns, particularly faces. While we are able to differentiate different faces with apparent ease, computer facial recognition systems have a much harder time of it, relying on powerful computers and complex models to accurately identify the majority of differences between faces. This has held facial recognition systems back from being widely adopted, but now researchers at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) have developed a technique that significantly reduces the amount of computer power required without compromising accuracy. Read More
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New Panaboard continues the evolution of the Electronic WhiteBoard

By - July 13, 2009 5 Pictures
The concept of the whiteboard seems distinctly old school and analog, but effective collaboration practices never die as the evolution of the electronic whiteboard at Panasonic continues to bear testimony. The new Panaboard UB-5838C Widescreen and the UB-5338C whiteboards incorporate a color scanning feature, so users can accurately print the outcomes of brainstorms, complex diagrams or ideas, in full color. Read More
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Shake, rattle, and roll: Sony’s feature packed HD Handycam CX520VE

By - July 12, 2009 16 Pictures
Sony has announced its new flagship HD camcorder, the Handycam HDR-CX520VE. Equipped with three-way image stabilization as well as a new sensor, lens, and image processor, the CX520VE provides what Sony calls its best picture quality ever. Shooting full HD video and surround sound, the unit also features 64GB of internal memory and GPS “geotagging” of video clips. Read More
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MIT’s ‘flexible camera’ replaces lens with fiber web

By - July 8, 2009 2 Pictures
Imagine that instead of carrying a camera in your jacket pocket, your entire jacket was the camera. That is the promise of a new type of light-detecting fibers developed by researchers at MIT. The team from the Institute's Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) has developed light-detecting fibers that, when woven into a web, act as a flexible “camera”. Fabric made from these fibers could be joined to a computer to create a large, foldable telescope or made into a soldier’s uniform to provide greater situational awareness. Read More
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Video perfection tool catches up with TV cop technology

By - July 3, 2009 1 Picture
Anyone who has watched CSI or any of the Law & Order franchises has no doubt witnessed a well groomed police technician magically clean up fuzzy security camera vision, thereby providing the detectives with the vital number plate or the face of a criminal at the push of a button. The truth is, of course, far removed from such TV fantasy – at least it has been until now. A new video “perfection tool” developed by researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) helps investigators enhance raw video images to improve the quality at which the images were originally recorded. Read More
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Magic Lantern unofficial firmware for the EOS 5D Mark II shows Canon how it's done

By - July 1, 2009 1 Picture
Canon might want to consider putting a certain Trammell Hudson on the payroll. Hudson has developed an enhancement to the firmware of the Canon 5D Mark II digital SLR camera to make the already impressive camera an even more attractive option for shooting professional video. Dubbed ‘Magic Lantern’, the new firmware includes both audio and video fixes and is a completely open platform, meaning users are free to extend the Magic Lantern firmware themselves. Read More
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