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UBC coren: High-tech, high-price carbon fiber fixie

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October 5, 2012

UBC promises that each frame is hand built in clean room conditions in accordance with mot...

UBC promises that each frame is hand built in clean room conditions in accordance with motorsports standards

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The UBC coren is what happens when creative minds get to run amok without the usual constraints imposed by reality. The new single speed bicycle combines a unique shape, belt drive and plenty of high-tech composite.

"Carte blanche" – it's a phrase that designers, artists and creative minds thrive on. And it's a phrase that the design team at German carbon fiber outfitter UBC got to hear directly from CEO Ulf Bräutigam, who also mentioned ignoring the bicycle production rule book. It's no surprise that the resulting coren looks a little different than the standard bicycle.

The carbon belt drive is quiet and light

UBC typically concerns itself with faster, more technological modes of transportation like race cars and aircraft. Instead of taking a step down to design a bicycle, it decided to bring the bicycle a step up in terms of high-tech design. The coren's unique, parallelogram-like frame is built of the T1000 carbon fiber ordinarily reserved for Formula 1 monocoques.

Instead of the typical chain, the coren uses a Gates Carbon Drive belt system. The toothed carbon belt is designed to be quiet, smooth, maintenance free, lightweight and durable when compared to a chain. Other components hail from suppliers such as BOR, ENVE, Schmolke, Trickstuff and Tune. UBC lists weight at just under 17 pounds (7.7 kg).

The coren pedelec

UBC promises that each frame is hand built in clean room conditions in accordance with motorsports standards. It plans to offer the limited edition bike in single speed, fixed gear and pedal-assisted electric configurations by the end of the year. The starting price is €25,000 (about US$32,500 as of publishing). Who said German carbon fiber bikes defined by French terms come cheap?

Source: UBC via ISPO

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
6 Comments

Pretty, but there are reasons why it is a good thing bike frames are not usually tall near the handle bar - two reasons to be exact (not counting material or production reasons).

When one stops on a bike there is a need for room to stand over the bike. Especially if the stop is an emergency one room is needed else certain personal items can get in trouble (hence the two reasons)!

BZD
5th October, 2012 @ 04:47 am PDT

"The UBC coren is what happens when creative minds get to run amok without the usual constraints imposed by reality." Or rider comfort!

Will someone out there design a high tech, light weight, COMFORTABLE CRUISER BIKE?

Enough of these back breaking wannabe racer bikes.

Gregg Eshelman
5th October, 2012 @ 07:19 pm PDT

@BZD You obviously can't track stand :P

Lewis Taka
5th October, 2012 @ 09:55 pm PDT

Another problem is riding long distances maintains high pressure and reduced blood flow in the perinial area.

Dawar Saify
7th October, 2012 @ 04:48 am PDT

$32,500? I didn't know hipsters had any money.

John Bullard
16th October, 2012 @ 05:42 am PDT

@Joey Tourettes

You can only be a hipster if you have a lot of money to buy clothes/bikes/beer/cigs that make you LOOK like you don't have a lot of money.

citizenchan
16th October, 2012 @ 11:44 am PDT
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