Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Conway E-Rider kicks out 2,000 watts

By

September 8, 2010

The Conway E-Rider electric mountain bike on display at Eurobike

The Conway E-Rider electric mountain bike on display at Eurobike

Image Gallery (3 images)

You may have just read our take on the KTM eGnition freeride bike that was on display at this year’s Eurobike, but it wasn’t the only electric mountain bike in attendance. German bike-maker Conway also used the event to premiere its burly-looking E-Rider. Its motor can generate up to 2,000 watts, which definitely separates it from the commuting ebikes, while its weight is somewhere under 20 kilograms (44 lbs.) – not bad for something with a motor and a battery.

When not belting out bursts of 2,000 watts, the E-Rider’s brushless motor puts out 1,000 watts of continuous power. It runs off a 36-volt lithium-ion battery pack, rated at 626 watt-hours. The battery can recharge up to 80 percent in one hour, 100 percent in three hours, and offers a range of up to 110 kilometers (68 miles) depending on use.

The bicycle itself has a 7020 aluminum frame, and a dual crown spring fork that offers 160 millimeters (6.3-in) of travel.

The Conway E-Rider electric mountain bike

Like the KTM eGnition, the stated purpose of the Conway E-Rider is to let alpine riders avoid having to take a chair lift up to the trail head. The company also hopes that it can open up new, higher-altitude trails to riders who otherwise wouldn’t be able to reach them.

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
7 Comments

I definitely need one of these !

Ariel Dahan
9th September, 2010 @ 08:08 am PDT

look at those rims.. what are those ??

thats a bike !

http://www.thekpv.com

Terry Hope
10th September, 2010 @ 11:49 am PDT

Good specs but I guess we are left to do the math when it comes to performance figures, both speed and distance? I really like the layout and design of this bike but might change the seat. It looks dangerous but then again, I'm 60ish and younger men would spend more time up on the pedals.

Will, the tink
10th September, 2010 @ 12:46 pm PDT

Aluminum frame and a minimalistic one at that. Short life in off-road use methinks. And no warning either. Aluminum, you know...also illegal in all 50 states, alas!...that 2.5 hp thing is above our limit.

waltinseattle
16th September, 2010 @ 12:51 pm PDT

When analysing any motor house power, you should always go by the continuous hp rating. Continuous hp is what the motor constantly runs at while the peak hp is really only reached when the machine is initially turned on and when it is starting to strain (i.e. changing incline levels...). If a motor were to run at its peak for too long, this can eventually burn the motor. In Summary, a true reflection of the motor rating should be based on the continuous hp as this is what the motor constantly runs at.

So the motor in that bike is then rated at 1000 watts (continuous hp/kw mentioned on their website) not 2000 watts.

I also believe that either the weight of the bike is not true or the range given is exaggerate like is so often done on E-bikes because they always say 'UP TO' so and so many km/miles, meaning with maximum pedal assist, no hills, no wind, no stop and start, riding at slow speed etc.

That small sprocket from the e-motor that the dublex chain is running off is from an engineering point of view too small and will wear excessively, and that chain drive needs to be covered and has no tensioner.

The pedal-crank is not free wheeling which will cause all sorts of problems

The strength of the wheels have been compromised on just to keep the weight low.

I build my own motorized bicycle and electric ones just can't keep up in range or durability for mountain use...(see: bikemoto.wordpress.com)

Almoto
20th September, 2010 @ 05:09 am PDT

u may need the electric generator. i think. small as A4 paper size.

Hadi Anwar
11th October, 2010 @ 12:20 pm PDT

Where can i buy a KTM electric Eurobike 2010 in Canada ?

Facebook User
11th March, 2011 @ 12:03 pm PST
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