Compare the latest tech products
ADVERTISEMENT

Computers

It doesn’t seem so long ago we were oohing and ahhing that an external hard drive could hold a terabyte (TB) of data, then a couple... and the march continues unabated. Western Digital (WD) has followed on from its 2TB MyBook with the release of the 4TB dual-drive My Book Studio Edition II. Read More
Since Snow Leopard, aka OS X 10.6, was previewed at last year's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) Mac users have been waiting patiently for release details. Now, courtesy of this year’s WWDC, they have them. With most of the improvements of the under-the-hood variety, the upgrade for Mac OS Leopard users will be available from September at the Global Financial Crisis friendly price of USD$29. Read More
NEC’s CRV43 ultra-widescreen curved monitor is one of those bits of tech that's definitely drool-worthy and likely to put some real wow into the workplace. The 43-inch curved display is essentially four digital light processing (DLP) monitors stitched together with LED backlighting to deliver an impressive set of numbers - 2880x900 double WXGA native resolution, 0.02 second response time, 200 cd/m2 brightness and 10,000:1 contrast ratio. First unveiled at CES in January 2008, the monitor will go on the market next month. All you need is a cool USD$8000 and it's yours to drool over. Read More
Billed as the largest capacity, fastest bus-powered portable storage solution on the market, OWC's Mercury On-The-Go Pro series features 500GB, 7200RPM HDD and triple interface (FireWire 800, FireWire 400 and/or USB 2.0) connectivity for data transfer at speeds of up to 100MB/s. Read More
Here at Gizmag we've covered some unusual gadgets over the years, but a computer hidden in a vase? What at first might sound like a joke, actually makes sense when you consider the once-humble PC is arguably more at home in the living room than the study as digital content and media have grown. Computer manufacturers have obliged by producing PCs designed to blend tastefully with the décor – but none of them blend as seamlessly as the PC-in–a-vase from Taiwanese manufacturer ECS. Read More
NVIDIA and Supermicro today announced the immediate availability of a new class of server that combines massively parallel NVIDIA Tesla GPUs with multi-core CPUs in a single 1U rack-mount server. This unique configuration delivers 12 times the performance of a traditional quad-core CPU-based 1U server. Supermicro will be demonstrating the NVIDIA Tesla-based SuperServer 6016T-GF-TM2 at Computex 2009 in Taiwan this week. Read More
NEC Electronics America is set to show an important new white LED-based LCD module this week at the Society for Information Display (SID) Display Week 2009 in San Antonio, Texas. The amorphous-silicon color thin-film-transistor (TFT) liquid crystal display (LCD) module achieves an ultra-wide color gamut for 100 percent of the Adobe RGB color range by incorporating a newly developed LED light-source unit into the backlight system and a newly developed color filter. Read More
If you want speed, torque, and raw two-wheeled muscle, buy yourself a Yamaha V-Max motorcycle. If you are looking for performance and scalable power for your virtualized data center, check out EMC’s Symmetrix V-Max. Yamaha’s version may offer a claimed 197 horsepower, but EMC says their V-Max Engine churns out enough power to support hundreds of petabytes of storage for enterprise cloud storage networks. Read More
Most users have come to accept the new Twitter-style Facebook home page - but one thing continues to infuriate: all the annoying quiz and application updates in your news feed. But all is not lost if you are sick of learning "what Simpsons character" your friends are - here's a quick and easy way to make those annoying quizzes disappear from your news feed. Read More
Sharp Corporation is releasing a new notebook PC with an innovative optical sensor built into an LCD touch pad – which the company claims is a world first – at the end of the month. While Sharp’s Mebius PC-NJ70A netbook will only be released initially in Japan, the 4-inch track pad, which recognizes input by pen or touch, clearly signals the direction notebooks are headed. According to Sharp, a pen can be used to input drawings and text, while finger gestures on the LCD pad can enlarge, shrink or rotate items on the notebook screen – all in addition to the conventional ways a mouse is used. Users can sign their name to a photo before emailing it, for instance; or they can use two fingers to zoom in and out of internet websites to adjust them for the best view. Read More
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT