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Computers

Getac's resistive-type multi-touch technology works with or without gloves

Anyone who has tried to use a multi-touch touchscreen with anything other than their bare skin will know that it’s just not possible, no matter how hard you press. That’s because the capacitance technology used for the bulk of multi-touch devices doesn’t detect pressure, but measures the changes in electrical resistance caused by contact with a conductor – in this case, the human body. That might be annoying in cold climates, but is an even bigger problem in situations that require the wearing of protective gloves. Getac’s line of rugged Tablet PCs will be the first commercially-available rugged computers to solve this problem by offering a multi-touch screen that works with or without gloves.Read More

Pioneer BDR-205 12x Blu-ray disc writer the fastest so far

The Pioneer Electronics BDR-205 Blu-ray Disc Computer Writer is the industry’s first and fastest model to feature up to 12x write speed for single and dual-layer Blu-ray discs, up from previous speeds of 8x. Pioneer says that when the unit is utilized with a properly configured PC, the drive’s Low Vibration Mechanism Design improves overall writing accuracy, especially for consumers and business people who need to preserve ever-increasing amounts of critical data, making it an ideal choice for authoring providers and system builders.Read More

Belkin's Conserve Surge helps reduce power consumption

We first looked at Belkin’s Conserve Surge protector early last year. The company has just released a new version that includes a clever automatic timer to control power usage. The surge protector has eight outlets – two keep PCs and critical devices permanently on, while the other six outlets are automatically turned off after 11 hours. This allows you to power down non-essential office equipment at night and on weekends, saving valuable energy and money.Read More

Dell's Latitude Z: world’s first laptop with wireless docking and inductive charging

Dell's latest addition to its Latitude series of laptops, the Latitude Z, has a number of ‘firsts’ the company is hoping will convince consumers to choose it over a plethora of other brands and models. Dell says its Latitude Z is the world's first 16-inch laptop that is less than an inch thick and also the first laptop with wireless docking and inductive charging (wireless power - no more cords to trip over or lose). The inclusion of Dell’s EdgeTouch allows users to operate commonly used applications and media controls through a touch interface on the screen’s bezel, while Dell’s Latitude ON technology delivers instant, interactive access to email, the Web, contacts, attachments and calendars. Read More

Microsoft patent multi touch screen keyboard

Up until now, touch screen keyboards have been problematic in that the user has had to look at the screen to navigate the location of the keys. That could all be set to change with news that Microsoft has filed a most interesting patent for a touch screen keyboard that uses multi touch capabilities to incorporate the user’s own hands as a physical point of reference. Read More

Cyber 'ants' patrol PC networks against computer worms and other threats

In looking for highly efficient ways to solve complex problems, we've often seen researchers mimic the solutions found by nature over billions of years: smart fabrics inspired by pine cones, spectrum analyzers modeled after the human ear and powerful search-and-optimization genetic and evolutionary algorithms, to name just a few. The latest piece of news comes from Wake Forest University, where the group dynamics of ant colonies have inspired security software to fight computer worms and other threats.Read More

Intel predicts optical future for consumer gadgets with 10Gb/s Light Peak interface

Though it may not make it into everyone’s ‘top ten’ list of most desirable technological developments, replacing the spaghetti-junction of wires that typically gathers behind a desk or workspace would undoubtedly be a welcome advance. Wireless peripherals are helping the situation somewhat and wireless power will be a massive boon once perfected but, in the meantime, we’re looking to technologies like optical cables to handle high-volume data transfer. Intel’s recent research in this area should be of particular interest, since it’s designed to replace or augment connections used in consumer-based electronics, such as USB2.0, HDMI, Firewire, DVI and the like.Read More

Up to six screens from one AMD Eyefinity graphics card

Forget high definition, AMD claims its ATI Eyefinity multi-screen technology has up to 12 times 1080p resolution, breaking into almost true eye-definition video quality. It's able to power up to six monitors from one card, is Windows 7 ready and positively champing at the bit to unleash the power of Direct X 11. Users can look forward to a much improved immersion gaming experience, or to taking advantage of one huge desktop workspace for better multi-task management, or to being able to keep an eye on breaking Internet news while also playing a game or watching a DVD.Read More

Wacom's new Bamboo gets you multi-touching for under $100

Since multi-touch technology was popularized with the introduction of Apple's iPhone, many companies have come to realize its great potential in terms of improving the user experience. Wacom's second generation Bamboo input devices add multi-touch support to its standard pressure sensitive pen providing users with a cheap, cross-platform solution to experience both multi-touch and ultra precise pointer control on their personal computers with a single tablet.Read More

Intel Core i7 Mobile Processor - fastest ever laptop chips

Intel says processing power that was reserved for desktop computing can now be conducted on laptops equipped with its new Intel Core i7 Mobile Processor and Intel Core i7 Mobile Processor Extreme Edition. Using its award-winning and super-fast Nehalem microarchitecture, along with the new Intel PM55 Express Chipset, gamers, photographers, digital music mixers, movie-makers, etc, will no longer have to be anchored to a desktop computer to access the processing power they need.Read More

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